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This program requires you to be a current licensed registered nurse. Please check out other programs to reach your education goals such as the BA in Health and Wellness.

What is a Doctor of Philosophy in Education?

Achieve one of the ultimate degrees available in the education field when you earn your Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Education at the University of Arizona Global Campus (UAGC). Attain the expertise to advance your position, further improve your credentials, or seek a career at an education institution. If you value the importance of learning and improving our education system, then you understand why pursuing a doctorate in education is necessary to enact meaningful change in schools and classrooms across the country. As more individuals are going back to school, a doctorate degree in education is also a great option when competing for top education positions. Additionally, GRE test scores are not a requirement when pursuing a PhD in education from UAGC.

Accelerated 6- to 9-week courses
Transfer up to 30 approved credits
1 course at a time
$0 Application Fee

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Degree Completion Journey

The online doctorate in education includes 15 core courses in education and research, plus one elective research course, and a capstone seminar. The PhD program explores educational theories, practices, policies, strategies, and issues. The coursework leads up to your doctoral dissertation, which includes two dissertation planning courses as well as five units of the dissertation course. This online doctorate in education is designed to be a flexible alternative to a traditional college education. Your courses are meant to fit with your current schedule, as you will have access to course materials and resources all from your computer, tablet, smartphone, or other Wi-Fi enabled device.

1

Year 1

  • Educational practice is based on theories and philosophies of learning and cognition. These accepted theories have evolved, from idealism to realism, pragmatism to constructivism, and are incorporating new research in brain-based learning. This course will focus on theories and philosophies of learning and cognition along with ways in which these theories are studied and applied in educational practice.

  • This course examines the history and philosophy of education, as well as a systematic analysis of the effect of social change on education and vice versa. 

  • In this course students will learn foundation skills for searching the academic literature and constructing a sound argument. Students will develop a detailed topic outline and an annotated bibliography of resources in an area of interest. This course will give students the opportunity to develop the research skills to succeed in their coursework and complete either an Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation.

  • In this seminar class, students will examine cultural, institutional and social issues impacting education today and how they shape educational processes and outcomes. Students will be introduced to extensive academic and professional resources as you explore topics of interest around policy, technology, culture, leadership, teaching and learning. Application of techniques for conducting evidence based research will help students formulate and support positions around issues and topics. Students will also conduct an in-depth review of an educational topic of choice to present and discuss with peers. This course gives students an opportunity to delve deeply into topics relevant to them and to inform and educate peers around these topics.

  • This course explores several contemporary leadership theories applicable to the education context. Using case studies and a selected problem of practice, students will propose solutions to real-world dilemmas impacting education today. An emphasis in diversity and inclusive leadership practices will encourage students to model decision-making skills that address the unique demands of today’s leaders. Students will also examine principles for leading change that will advance an agenda of equitable and sustainable outcomes for the entire learning community.

  • This course involves the advanced study of research design, and the quantitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. Students will gain experience developing their own research ideas and learning how to select and apply appropriate research designs to test those ideas. Through the process of critiquing research articles, students will also learn how to evaluate which research designs would be appropriate to test various areas of inquire, as well as how to communicate the methods and results of particular quantitative studies. Students will be required to complete a training on ethics in research, as well as complete a quantitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research.

  • This course explores current trends in higher education with an emphasis on challenges and opportunities that administrative leadership will face in the next ten years due to changing demographics, technology, structures, and resources. The 21st century education administrator faces a number of challenges including student preparedness, campus safety, reduced institutional aid, programmatic costs, environmental concerns, and a myriad of other factors that make appropriate problem assessment and decision-making a priority. This course will focus on diagnosing the root causes of common institutional problems and apply appropriate solution-based critical thinking skills.
  • Students will identify and analyze the socio-cultural, institutional, historical, legal and political resources, policies, and needs associated with serving diverse populations in an educational setting. They will be prepared to advocate for underserved communities and for constituents with diverse needs and learning processes. Students will grapple with complex situations and propose strategies for resolution.
2

Year 2

  • This course involves the advanced study of research design, in general, and the qualitative inquiry, in particular, that can be used in addressing research questions. The epistemological assumptions underlying the qualitative methodology will be explored as students become familiar with the philosophical issues underlying how we know what we know. The ability to choose a researchable topic and create associated research questions will be emphasized. Students will become familiar with a variety of approaches including ethnography, grounded theory, phenomenology, narrative, participatory action research, and case study. A variety of common data collection methods will be studied, such as observation, interviews, surveys, and historical document collection. Validation and reliability standards, as well as evaluation criteria for qualitative approaches will be addressed. Students will be required to complete training on ethics in research, as well as complete a qualitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research.

  • This course explores literature and recent debate related to culture and linguistic diversity, learning, and instruction both within the United States and globally. Emphasis will be placed on an exploration of the history of and recent debates related to social, cultural and linguistic diversity, learning, and instruction in the service of leveraging resources and systems to support student learning in diverse populations.

  • This course will provide students with an opportunity to study curriculum assessment, design and evaluation principles, processes, approaches and models. The focus will be on the resulting impact on curriculum, assessment, design and evaluation modifications at the classroom, school, system, state, and national levels. The influence of societal trends will be examined as will recent major higher educational reform efforts and potential future trends.
  • This course will equip learners to recognize and integrate appropriate learning theory into instructional design, and to make effective use of instructional interventions, technology and media. Participants will evaluate current theories and models, policies and initiatives, along with original scholarship, to examine the historical and philosophical foundations of these theories and their influence on the use of technology and media.
  • This course will provide students with an opportunity to study the politics of education as well as educational policy making, processes, approaches and models. The focus will be on the making of educational policies, the politics involved relating to non-profit and for-profit educational institutions, emerging educational technologies, and governance in higher education institutions. The influence of societal trends will be examined as will recent major higher education reform efforts and potential future trends at the local, state, regional, and national level. Topics of study include educational policy making, globalism and the politics of education, the politics of learning, the politics of inclusion and exclusion, and the politics of educational reforms.
  • This course explores the contradictory roles of educators and educational institutions in both preserving the past and preparing students for the future. The impacts of recent innovations and advancements in technologies have not been fully realized and will be the foundation of exploration in this course. The role of change agents, early adopters, and the diffusion process on the acceptance of innovation will be investigated.
  • This course will build on the work students began in Scholarly Argument I and the research skills honed throughout the curriculum. Organization of content and formulating a well-researched scholarly argument are key learning outcomes. Students will produce a first draft of a literature review in their content areas and review potential research methodologies for completing either an Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation.

  • Students with interest in qualitative research, or with a desire to utilize this methodology for their respective doctoral dissertation, will be given an opportunity to greatly expand their existing knowledge base on qualitative research methodology. Students may elect to begin working on a preliminary proposal for their doctoral dissertation (or select and explore a topic of interest that may become the dissertation topic) for the culminating project in this course.

3

Year 3

  • This seminar provides students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in their curriculum to highly realistic case studies related to their fields of specialization for the doctorate. Through discussions among students and the instructor, students will review, analyze and evaluate case studies emphasizing the practice of the content in their curriculum. The course will involve the analysis and evaluation of one or more case studies. Students will contemplate complex questions posed by their instructor, reply to those questions, respond to other students’ analyses and evaluations, and receive faculty feedback. Each student will submit a final assignment on each case, involving his or her critical thinking on the core issues presented in the case and the presentation and defense of an approach to addressing those core issues. (This course may not be transferred in.)

  • In this course, students begin drafting their dissertation under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on the description of their topic, refinement of their research questions, and outlining their review of the literature with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student's individual dissertation committees, as described in the current Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during, or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II.

  • In this course students continue drafting their dissertation from Dissertation Planning I under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on further refinement of the description of their topic, the final draft wording of their research questions, and beginning to write their review of the literature and research methodology with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. Students will exchange research concepts and proposed approaches about their research methodology with other students proposing similar methods (qualitative, quantitative, mixed, action). Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student's individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II.

  • Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five consecutive terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook.

  • Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five consecutive terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook.

4

Year 4

  • Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five consecutive terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook.

  • Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five consecutive terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook.

  • Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five consecutive terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook.

Program Requirements

To be awarded the PhD in Education, you must complete the program coursework of 59 credits with a 3.0 minimum cumulative grade point average. You will need to complete three non-credit In-Residence Workshops.* You will also need to complete all Dissertation requirements.**

* For the PhD in education, you are required to attend three In-Residence workshops as defined in the University Academic Catalog.

** As a requirement for graduation from the University of Arizona Global Campus with a degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), each student must complete and successfully defend a Dissertation. The purpose of the Dissertation is to ensure that the student has mastered the ability to pursue a systematic investigation, which examines significant issues or problems. The Dissertation requirement is also designed to contribute to the student's knowledge, skills, and research expertise. Students choose a topic that addresses carefully chosen research questions that the student then investigates with quantitative or qualitative research, with a meta-analysis, or with a program design or program evaluation. Prerequisites, timelines for completion, and attendance requirements for the Dissertation, as well as a detailed explanation of each step in the process, are described in the Dissertation Handbook.

Special Terms and Conditions

An online degree from the University of Arizona Global Campus does not lead to immediate teacher licensure in any state. If you want to become a classroom teacher, contact your state’s education authorities prior to enrolling at the University of Arizona Global Campus to determine what state-specific requirements you must complete before obtaining your teacher’s license. University of Arizona Global Campus graduates will be subject to additional requirements on a state-by-state basis that will include one or more of the following: student teaching or practicum experience, additional coursework, additional testing, or, if the state requires a specific type of degree to seek alternative certification, earning an additional degree. None of the University of Arizona Global Campus online education programs are accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), which is a requirement for certification in some states. Other factors, such as a student’s criminal history, may prevent an applicant from obtaining licensure or employment in this field of study. All prospective students are advised to visit the Education Resource Organizations Directory (EROD) and to contact the licensing body of the state where they are licensed or intend to obtain licensure to verify that these courses qualify for teacher certification, endorsement, and/or salary benefits in that state prior to enrolling. Prospective students are also advised to regularly review the state’s policies and procedures relating to licensure as those policies are subject to change.

Alabama Students: Contact the Teacher Education and Certification Division of the Alabama State Department of Education at 334-353-8567 or www.alsde.edu to verify that these programs qualify for teacher certification, endorsement, and/or salary benefits. State authorization to provide a program related to the preparation of teachers or other P–12 school/system personnel does not indicate eligibility for an Alabama certificate. Applicants for an Alabama certificate based on reciprocity must meet Alabama’s test requirements and submit a valid, renewable professional educator certificate/license issued by another state at the degree level, grade level, and in the teaching field or area of instructional support for which an Alabama certificate is sought and for which Alabama issues a certificate. Applicants for Alabama certification in an area of administration must also document at least three years of full-time employment as administrator in a P–12 school system(s). www.alsde.edu.

Georgia Students: An education degree offered through the University of Arizona Global Campus online modality does not lead to teacher licensure in the state of Georgia. In Georgia, an alternative route to certification is not available

Hawaii Students: An education degree offered through the University of Arizona Global Campus online modality does not lead to teacher licensure in the state of Hawaii. In Hawaii, an alternative route to certification is not available.

Kentucky Residents:Please be advised that although the University of Arizona Global Campus College of Education offers a variety of programs aimed at preparing potential educators in diverse settings, our K–12 educator preparation programs are NOT accredited in Kentucky by the Education Professional Standards Board and are NOT recognized for initial, additional, or renewal of certification or salary enhancement (rank change) for K–12 educators in Kentucky. For more information, visit the Education Professional Standards Board’s website at http://www.epsb.ky.gov/mod/page/view.php?id=220.

Certain degree programs may not be available in all states.

Careers in Education

You will benefit from opportunities to advance your career with a degree in education at the master or doctorate level. While teaching positions may only require state certification, most school districts require candidates to hold a degree before advancing to senior management positions. Some of the careers you could pursue with your Doctor of Philosophy in Education include:

 

  • Preschool and Childcare Center/Program Education Administrator
  • Elementary and Secondary School Administrators
  • Instructional Coordinators
  • Discover more information about degree programs in education at the University of Arizona Global Campus.

 

The Master of Arts in Education and the Doctor of Philosophy in Education are not CAEP**, TEAC or NCATE accredited, which is a requirement for certification in some states, and successful completion of the Masters of Arts in Education by itself does not lead to certification or licensure in any state. Other factors, such as a student’s criminal history, may prevent an applicant from obtaining licensure or employment in this field of study. All prospective students are advised to visit the Education Resource Organizations Directory (EROD) and to contact the licensing body of the state where they are licensed or intend to obtain licensure to verify that these courses qualify for teacher certification, endorsement, and/or salary benefits in that state prior to enrolling. Prospective students are also advised to regularly review the states’ policies and procedures relating to licensure as those policies are subject to change.

** The Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) is the resulting entity from the merger of the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) and National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

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Are you currently a licensed RN?

This program requires you to be a current licensed registered nurse. Please check out other programs to reach your education goals such as the BA in Health and Wellness.