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This program requires you to be a current licensed registered nurse. Please check out other programs to reach your education goals such as the BA in Health and Wellness.

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Are you currently a licensed RN?

This program requires you to be a current licensed registered nurse. Please check out other programs to reach your education goals such as the BA in Health and Wellness.

What is a Doctor of Psychology?

Improve the emotional and mental health of your fellow human beings with the Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) from the University of Arizona Global Campus (UAGC). In this online degree program, you will build your knowledge base in the history and systems of psychology, and then you will focus your PsyD degree by selecting a specialization that aligns with your specific career and research interests. If you value the importance of improving the mental health of others, then you can understand why pursuing a doctorate in psychology is essential to enact meaningful change in society.

Accelerated 6- to 9-week courses
Transfer up to 30 approved credits
1 course at a time
$0 Application Fee

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Learn more about how to get started in your degree program.

Degree Completion Journey

Online PsyD students become practitioner-scholars by becoming knowledgeable of the theory, research, and evidence-based practice in their specializations. The Doctor of Psychology includes 10 core courses, plus seven specialization courses and a capstone seminar. You will then complete an Applied Doctoral Project, which includes two planning courses as well as five units of the Applied Doctoral Project** course. This online doctorate in psychology is taught by qualified faculty members who all have doctorates themselves. They possess recent experience in the field of psychology, which allows them to teach theory and practical applications of the curriculum.

 

Specializations

1

Year 1

 
  • The course will provide an overview of the key events and accomplishments that have played an important role in the historical evolution of the psychology of leadership and the systems that form the basis of the discipline. A review of the history of organizational psychology introduces several important distinctions that define the discipline, and theoretical models and perspectives that trace the evolution of theory and practice. The learning activities emphasize the dichotomy between the science and applications of organizational psychology and leadership. The course approaches the psychology of leadership from three different perspectives 1) objectives for research and practice in the field, 2) basic methodological orientation of practitioners and 3) the systems and research-based foundations that form the basis of organizational psychology and the psychology of leadership.

  • This course is designed to provide the student with a foundation of human physiology including the nervous, hormonal, reproductive, and sensory systems, and the attendant functions of digestion, sleep, learning and memory, emotion, and other human biological functions. The course provides an essential knowledge base for most other offerings in the field of psychology.

  • In this course students will learn foundation skills for searching the academic literature and constructing a sound argument. Students will develop a detailed topic outline and an annotated bibliography of resources in an area of interest. This course will give students the opportunity to develop the research skills to succeed in their coursework and complete either an Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation.

  • This course provides an overview of group theory, processes, and dynamics in organizations. It will also examine effective behaviors and characteristics of facilitating/leading groups in an organizational setting. Students will be afforded the opportunity to participate in group simulations both as participant and facilitator. Students will receive evaluation and feedback on their group facilitation skills. A strong emphasis is placed on ethical standards and behavior in groups along with legal issues. The impact on groups of factors such as diversity, culture, distance, and others are explored.

  • This course involves a critical analysis of contemporary criminological theories and current applications or revisions of traditional theories. Students will explore topics ranging from restorative justice and gender-driven theories to critical criminology and environmental criminology. The relative benefits and drawbacks of each topic will be examined, as well as the status of current research relating to them.

  • As the first part of a two-course sequence for students who will do an Applied Doctoral Project (ADP), this course involves the advanced study of research design, and the quantitative and qualitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. The course covers social scientific inquiry and research design, quantitative methodologies, and qualitative methodologies. Students will apply these approaches to a topic of their choice as a possible direction for developing their own ADP.

  • This course examines the processing of offenders through the criminal justice system, from arrest to corrections. Issues of due process will be analyzed and critiqued, with particular emphasis placed on judicial system parameters. Recognition of the need for the three components of the justice system to process cases efficiently will lead the student to an understanding of how systems theory is integrated into an overall analysis of the justice system.

  • This course focuses on the etiology and diagnosis of adult psychopathological disorders. Students develop skills in case conceptualization and addressing adult disorders, and differential diagnosis and construction of a systematic treatment plan, emerging treatment revision, assessment of outcome, termination, and ethical issues in the treatment process. While placing treatment within a theoretical context, the real emphasis in this course is on treatment techniques aimed at symptom and problem reduction. Benefits and limitations of the diagnostic process are reviewed.

2

Year 2

 
  • This course focuses on the juvenile justice system, while highlighting differences between the juvenile and the adult criminal justice system. The course will not only cover traditional topics such as juvenile delinquency and the processing of juvenile offenders, but also current concerns about juvenile behavior, such as rates of youth violence and gang participation. The legal and philosophical bases for the separate system for juveniles will also be analyzed and debated.

  • The purpose of this course is to review the classification of different crime types, and to assess the distribution of each type across an array of socio-demographic variables, including class, race/ethnicity, gender, age, and locale. Students will learn about the various causes of the different types of crimes, and the specific ways the justice system should respond to different types of offenders.

  • The relationship between crime, mental health, and mental illness are covered in this course, with a focus on analyzing specific treatment and rehabilitation practices used with various types of offenders in diverse settings. Emphasis will be placed on changes in the mental health system that generated an increase in the presence of mentally ill offenders in the criminal justice system. Additionally, focus will be placed on issues such as the accurate assessment of mental illness, problems with certain therapy methods, and difficulties in treating dangerous offenders, drawbacks of utilizing personnel with limited training, and other impediments and limitations to effective treatment of offenders.

  • This course demonstrates the value of evidence-based practice as an integral part of formulating human services research and policy. Course work examines the current definition of evidence-based policy and approaches to move the field forward. The course provides an evaluation of evidence-based literature, including case study examples of the application of evidence-based practices in human services. The course also examines actions to further evidence-based policy, including preparing and communicating data more effectively, using existing analytic tools, conducting policy surveillance, and tracking outcomes with different types of evidence.

  • This course explores the relationships among criminality, drug use, and addiction by examining the evolution of drug policies from the following perspectives: enforcement, prosecution, and sentencing of drug users and addicts. The impact of drug laws on criminal justice processing will also be examined. Students will gain an understanding of drug use and will explore theoretical orientations that help to explain why people use drugs and how such use leads to criminal behavior. Further, the ways in which drug use and drug policies have an impact on the juvenile justice and criminal justice systems will be covered. An integral part of this course will be based on current events, policies on drug treatment, and enforcement of drug laws.

  • This course involves the study of the theory and practice of objective personality assessment and its application to executive coaching and organizational leadership. The course focuses on how objective personality assessment is used to provide insights into readiness for leadership and management roles. Primary emphasis is on those published instruments and inventories commonly used in executive coaching, organizational leadership assessment and organizational development, including instruments such as: FIRO-B, Social Style Profile, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, CPI 260, Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode, Campbell Leadership Index, Workplace Big Five, Change Style Indicator, Campbell Organizational Survey, and Conflicts Dynamics Profile. (All of the above will not necessarily be included in each session of the course; instructors will select representative examples from classes of instruments.)

  • As the second part of a two-course sequence for students who will do an Applied Doctoral Project (ADP), this course involves exploring project approaches specific to ADP development. Approaches include: Systematic Literature Review; Program Evaluation; Action Research; Program development; and Handbooks. Students will apply at least two of those approaches to their possible ADP topic and be equipped to explore a chosen approach deeper as part of future completion of their ADP.

  • This course focuses on methods used to examine the effectiveness of programs developed to treat offenders, support victims, as well those concerning crime prevention schemes. Prior evaluation models will be reviewed and problems and appropriate methods in assessing effective models of intervention will be discussed. Evaluation concerns will not only include program effectiveness, but also issues of ethics and legal requirements. Students will become familiar with how to address the need to design and evaluate programs according to such concerns. They will also have an opportunity to use prediction techniques and operational research methods to measure the effectiveness and performance of criminal justice programs.

3

Year 3

 
  • This course will build on the work students began in Scholarly Argument I and the research skills honed throughout the curriculum. Organization of content and formulating a well-researched scholarly argument are key learning outcomes. Students will produce a first draft of a literature review in their content areas and review potential research methodologies for completing either an Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation.

  • This seminar provides students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in their curriculum to highly realistic case studies related to their fields of specialization for the doctorate. Through discussions among students and the instructor, students will review, analyze and evaluate case studies emphasizing the practice of the content in their curriculum. The course will involve the analysis and evaluation of one or more case studies. Students will contemplate complex questions posed by their instructor, reply to those questions, respond to other students’ analyses and evaluations, and receive faculty feedback. Each student will submit a final assignment on each case, involving his or her critical thinking on the core issues presented in the case and the presentation and defense of an approach to addressing those core issues. (This course may not be transferred in.)

  • In this course students will begin drafting their Applied Doctoral Project under instructor supervision. Students will work individually on their Applied Doctoral Project drafts and their Project Justification drafts, focusing on the description of their project, refinement of their research questions, and a draft of their review of the literature. Students are encouraged to work closely with their chair during this course.

  • In this course students continue drafting their Applied Doctoral Project and Project Justification from Applied Doctoral Project Planning I. Students will further refine the description of their topic, their review of the literature and their Project Justification. At the end of this course, students should have a Project Justification in close to its final form.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

4

Year 4

 
  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

1

Year 1

 
  • The course will provide an overview of the key events and accomplishments that have played an important role in the historical evolution of the psychology of leadership and the systems that form the basis of the discipline. A review of the history of organizational psychology introduces several important distinctions that define the discipline, and theoretical models and perspectives that trace the evolution of theory and practice. The learning activities emphasize the dichotomy between the science and applications of organizational psychology and leadership. The course approaches the psychology of leadership from three different perspectives 1) objectives for research and practice in the field, 2) basic methodological orientation of practitioners and 3) the systems and research-based foundations that form the basis of organizational psychology and the psychology of leadership.

  • This course is designed to provide the student with a foundation of human physiology including the nervous, hormonal, reproductive, and sensory systems, and the attendant functions of digestion, sleep, learning and memory, emotion, and other human biological functions. The course provides an essential knowledge base for most other offerings in the field of psychology.

  • In this course students will learn foundation skills for searching the academic literature and constructing a sound argument. Students will develop a detailed topic outline and an annotated bibliography of resources in an area of interest. This course will give students the opportunity to develop the research skills to succeed in their coursework and complete either an Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation.

  • This course provides an overview of group theory, processes, and dynamics in organizations. It will also examine effective behaviors and characteristics of facilitating/leading groups in an organizational setting. Students will be afforded the opportunity to participate in group simulations both as participant and facilitator. Students will receive evaluation and feedback on their group facilitation skills. A strong emphasis is placed on ethical standards and behavior in groups along with legal issues. The impact on groups of factors such as diversity, culture, distance, and others are explored.

  • This course examines the full range of intervention strategies and learning modalities for promoting health and wellness. Students will explore the most updated and proven theories for achieving strong employee participation, improving lifestyles and health outcomes, as well as for reducing health care costs. Students will analyze and plan advanced interventions for new wellness programs and mature wellness programs. Additional topics in this advanced course will cover recent issues in health care such as the impact of an aging population, use of incentives, injury prevention, and medical consumerism. Students will conduct a survey of relevant research to determine suitable environments and conditions for integration of current best practices.

  • As the first part of a two-course sequence for students who will do an Applied Doctoral Project (ADP), this course involves the advanced study of research design, and the quantitative and qualitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. The course covers social scientific inquiry and research design, quantitative methodologies, and qualitative methodologies. Students will apply these approaches to a topic of their choice as a possible direction for developing their own ADP.

  • This course addresses important aspects of environmental influences on health and wellness, such as exposure to industrial chemicals, environmental toxins in air and water due to excessive use of agricultural chemicals, as well as contaminates from radon, molds and cancer causing erionite exposure. A corporate health and wellness consultant needs to be familiar with basic environmental hazards that cause illness both in the private and corporate settings, as well as how to address the health and wellness needs of those whose health has already been compromised through environmental agents.

  • This course focuses on the etiology and diagnosis of adult psychopathological disorders. Students develop skills in case conceptualization and addressing adult disorders, and differential diagnosis and construction of a systematic treatment plan, emerging treatment revision, assessment of outcome, termination, and ethical issues in the treatment process. While placing treatment within a theoretical context, the real emphasis in this course is on treatment techniques aimed at symptom and problem reduction. Benefits and limitations of the diagnostic process are reviewed.

2

Year 2

 
  • This course emphasizes the importance of reflecting on the self. The emphasis is on exploring unresolved shame, guilt, anger and interpersonal communication blunders, the role of forgiveness and making amends, along with negative and positive communication patterns as they help future health and wellness experts increase their effectiveness in advising and counseling employees, patients and clients in various organizational settings. The role of suppressing biased thinking is also addressed. The idea is that people who are able to address their own psychological needs are more efficient in helping others, than those who have unresolved issues.

  • This course examines healthcare delivery systems in various developed economies around the world. Content focuses on health insurance and other forms of healthcare financing, and means of providing efficient and effective healthcare to the general public. The course includes discussions of a variety of healthcare financing and healthcare delivery systems in countries around the world, some of which offer nationally financed programs, while others offer a combination of nationalized and private health care features. Pertinent issues related to healthcare financing and delivery systems located in the United States will be highlighted and analyzed. Topics include current issues and practices in the public policy related to financing and delivery of healthcare, preventative and wellness programs, access to healthcare, and quality of care.

  • This course examines recent advances in traditional and nontraditional research that have led to new ways of thinking about well-being and illness. Drawing on fields such as neuroscience, positive psychology, and interdisciplinary consciousness studies, students will enhance their awareness of ways to promote exceptional health habits through self-awareness and enlightenment. Students will also conduct in-depth studies of advanced research and theories that integrate mind-body practices beneficial to the health of individuals, groups, and organizations alike. Advanced practices in the areas of performance, health psychology, energy healing, indigenous, and Eastern medicine will be explored. Students will assess the efficacy and appropriateness of various practices to know which of them to incorporate into health promotion programs. The Health and Wellness Psychology student will be well-informed about the ramifications of nutrient deficiency, and that there is a fourth aspect of well-being besides (a) stress management, (b) dietary choices, and (c) exercise regimen. This fourth aspect is (d) dietary supplementation with the goal of counter-balancing nutrient deficiency. The safety of dietary supplements is explored, along with the differences between synthetic, natural and organic supplements.

  • This course demonstrates the value of evidence-based practice as an integral part of formulating human services research and policy. Course work examines the current definition of evidence-based policy and approaches to move the field forward. The course provides an evaluation of evidence-based literature, including case study examples of the application of evidence-based practices in human services. The course also examines actions to further evidence-based policy, including preparing and communicating data more effectively, using existing analytic tools, conducting policy surveillance, and tracking outcomes with different types of evidence.

  • This course focuses on the application of psychological principles to the workplace and how psychologists can facilitate the improvement of work environments, conditions, employee performance, and interpersonal/team functioning. In addition, the course provides a review of the basic theory, research, and practice in organizational training, development, and behavior. Topics covered include job performance and attitudes, work motivation, personnel selection and classification, group influence, and training and development. There is an emphasis on the contribution of specific psychological skills in organizational consultation.

  • This course involves the study of the theory and practice of objective personality assessment and its application to executive coaching and organizational leadership. The course focuses on how objective personality assessment is used to provide insights into readiness for leadership and management roles. Primary emphasis is on those published instruments and inventories commonly used in executive coaching, organizational leadership assessment and organizational development, including instruments such as: FIRO-B, Social Style Profile, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, CPI 260, Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode, Campbell Leadership Index, Workplace Big Five, Change Style Indicator, Campbell Organizational Survey, and Conflicts Dynamics Profile. (All of the above will not necessarily be included in each session of the course; instructors will select representative examples from classes of instruments.)

  • As the second part of a two-course sequence for students who will do an Applied Doctoral Project (ADP), this course involves exploring project approaches specific to ADP development. Approaches include: Systematic Literature Review; Program Evaluation; Action Research; Program development; and Handbooks. Students will apply at least two of those approaches to their possible ADP topic and be equipped to explore a chosen approach deeper as part of future completion of their ADP.

  • This seminar examines cutting edge trends in organizational change, the current global business climate, forces driving change, and issues related to positioning organizations for the future. The topics selected will connect change with culture, existing organizational strategies, and the process of change in future directions. Major case study examples of organizational change are included in the learning process.

3

Year 3

 
  • This course will build on the work students began in Scholarly Argument I and the research skills honed throughout the curriculum. Organization of content and formulating a well-researched scholarly argument are key learning outcomes. Students will produce a first draft of a literature review in their content areas and review potential research methodologies for completing either an Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation.

  • This seminar provides students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in their curriculum to highly realistic case studies related to their fields of specialization for the doctorate. Through discussions among students and the instructor, students will review, analyze and evaluate case studies emphasizing the practice of the content in their curriculum. The course will involve the analysis and evaluation of one or more case studies. Students will contemplate complex questions posed by their instructor, reply to those questions, respond to other students’ analyses and evaluations, and receive faculty feedback. Each student will submit a final assignment on each case, involving his or her critical thinking on the core issues presented in the case and the presentation and defense of an approach to addressing those core issues. (This course may not be transferred in.)

  • In this course students will begin drafting their Applied Doctoral Project under instructor supervision. Students will work individually on their Applied Doctoral Project drafts and their Project Justification drafts, focusing on the description of their project, refinement of their research questions, and a draft of their review of the literature. Students are encouraged to work closely with their chair during this course.

  • In this course students continue drafting their Applied Doctoral Project and Project Justification from Applied Doctoral Project Planning I. Students will further refine the description of their topic, their review of the literature and their Project Justification. At the end of this course, students should have a Project Justification in close to its final form.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

4

Year 4

 
  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

1

Year 1

 
  • The course will provide an overview of the key events and accomplishments that have played an important role in the historical evolution of the psychology of leadership and the systems that form the basis of the discipline. A review of the history of organizational psychology introduces several important distinctions that define the discipline, and theoretical models and perspectives that trace the evolution of theory and practice. The learning activities emphasize the dichotomy between the science and applications of organizational psychology and leadership. The course approaches the psychology of leadership from three different perspectives 1) objectives for research and practice in the field, 2) basic methodological orientation of practitioners and 3) the systems and research-based foundations that form the basis of organizational psychology and the psychology of leadership.

  • This course is designed to provide the student with a foundation of human physiology including the nervous, hormonal, reproductive, and sensory systems, and the attendant functions of digestion, sleep, learning and memory, emotion, and other human biological functions. The course provides an essential knowledge base for most other offerings in the field of psychology.

  • In this course students will learn foundation skills for searching the academic literature and constructing a sound argument. Students will develop a detailed topic outline and an annotated bibliography of resources in an area of interest. This course will give students the opportunity to develop the research skills to succeed in their coursework and complete either an Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation.

  • This course provides an overview of group theory, processes, and dynamics in organizations. It will also examine effective behaviors and characteristics of facilitating/leading groups in an organizational setting. Students will be afforded the opportunity to participate in group simulations both as participant and facilitator. Students will receive evaluation and feedback on their group facilitation skills. A strong emphasis is placed on ethical standards and behavior in groups along with legal issues. The impact on groups of factors such as diversity, culture, distance, and others are explored.

  • This course presents mind-body practices that provide the core elements of behaviors for individual and team performance. The student will learn to practice and to teach mastery of cognitive and physical skills to control systemic arousal and focusing behavior. The course will provide tools to construct performance profiles on individuals taking into account age, gender and cultural parameters. This depth of analysis provides the foundation to effectively integrate mind-body practices with performance enhancement. The student will be given strategies for measuring the efficacy of applying mind-body practices in diverse settings.

  • As the first part of a two-course sequence for students who will do an Applied Doctoral Project (ADP), this course involves the advanced study of research design, and the quantitative and qualitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. The course covers social scientific inquiry and research design, quantitative methodologies, and qualitative methodologies. Students will apply these approaches to a topic of their choice as a possible direction for developing their own ADP.

  • This course explores the practical applications of physiological and psychomotor dimensions of performance. The curriculum provides a comprehensive analysis of human movement and mental training applications. Parameters for measuring the stress response will be explored in conjunction with optimizing human performance. The lifelong developmental aspects of physiological and motor behavior will be examined.

  • This course focuses on the etiology and diagnosis of adult psychopathological disorders. Students develop skills in case conceptualization and addressing adult disorders, and differential diagnosis and construction of a systematic treatment plan, emerging treatment revision, assessment of outcome, termination, and ethical issues in the treatment process. While placing treatment within a theoretical context, the real emphasis in this course is on treatment techniques aimed at symptom and problem reduction. Benefits and limitations of the diagnostic process are reviewed.

2

Year 2

 
  • This course examines the ethical and legal issues confronting the sport psychology professional (SPP). Topics related to ethics, standards of practice, and interpersonal relationships in sport and performance psychology are explored. Students learn principles of ethical decision-making, standards of care specified by state and federal laws, boundaries of competence, diversity, informed consent, privacy and confidentiality, and avoiding bias, harm or exploitation. Students gain knowledge regarding the specifics of the current codes of ethics of the Association of Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), American Psychological Association (APA), and American Counseling Association (ACA).

  • This course examines crucial rehabilitation topics in sports and performance. The curriculum provides methods of psychological evaluation and treatment for injuries, addictions, eating disorders, and burnout. Students will investigate the dynamics of aggression in sports and performance settings. Retirement issues and exercise adherence strategies are explored. Inclusive in the course is a special debate section challenging students to confront current ethical issues in the field.

  • This course assists students in developing personal business plans. The curriculum addresses the financial, legal and ethical issues encountered in sports and performance psychology. The course gives the student persuasive arguments to use with clients to prevent their use of licit and illicit drugs and performance enhancing substances, as well as advising clients who have already used illicit substances and how to handle accusations against them for substance use or abuse. Potential career opportunities are identified and compared. The student will prepare a personal resume, market analysis and comprehensive business plan.

  • This course demonstrates the value of evidence-based practice as an integral part of formulating human services research and policy. Course work examines the current definition of evidence-based policy and approaches to move the field forward. The course provides an evaluation of evidence-based literature, including case study examples of the application of evidence-based practices in human services. The course also examines actions to further evidence-based policy, including preparing and communicating data more effectively, using existing analytic tools, conducting policy surveillance, and tracking outcomes with different types of evidence.

  • This course examines the integral relationship between leadership, communication, and group performance. The curriculum applies group and team principles to diverse populations such as youth, special needs, high-profile performers and support networks. Leadership is studied within the context of group functioning. Students will develop research protocols for assessing group and team functioning.

  • This course involves the study of the theory and practice of objective personality assessment and its application to executive coaching and organizational leadership. The course focuses on how objective personality assessment is used to provide insights into readiness for leadership and management roles. Primary emphasis is on those published instruments and inventories commonly used in executive coaching, organizational leadership assessment and organizational development, including instruments such as: FIRO-B, Social Style Profile, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, CPI 260, Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode, Campbell Leadership Index, Workplace Big Five, Change Style Indicator, Campbell Organizational Survey, and Conflicts Dynamics Profile. (All of the above will not necessarily be included in each session of the course; instructors will select representative examples from classes of instruments.)

  • As the second part of a two-course sequence for students who will do an Applied Doctoral Project (ADP), this course involves exploring project approaches specific to ADP development. Approaches include: Systematic Literature Review; Program Evaluation; Action Research; Program development; and Handbooks. Students will apply at least two of those approaches to their possible ADP topic and be equipped to explore a chosen approach deeper as part of future completion of their ADP.

  • This course is the pinnacle of performance enhancement teachings. The emphasis in this course is the development of advanced awareness skills in the attainment of self-mastery. The student learns how to guide individual goal achievement in congruence with current skills. The ultimate goal for the student is to recognize and cultivate individual and group experiences that are characterized by such terms as optimal performance, actualization, effortless awareness, flow, and peak experience.

3

Year 3

 
  • This course will build on the work students began in Scholarly Argument I and the research skills honed throughout the curriculum. Organization of content and formulating a well-researched scholarly argument are key learning outcomes. Students will produce a first draft of a literature review in their content areas and review potential research methodologies for completing either an Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation.

  • This seminar provides students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in their curriculum to highly realistic case studies related to their fields of specialization for the doctorate. Through discussions among students and the instructor, students will review, analyze and evaluate case studies emphasizing the practice of the content in their curriculum. The course will involve the analysis and evaluation of one or more case studies. Students will contemplate complex questions posed by their instructor, reply to those questions, respond to other students’ analyses and evaluations, and receive faculty feedback. Each student will submit a final assignment on each case, involving his or her critical thinking on the core issues presented in the case and the presentation and defense of an approach to addressing those core issues. (This course may not be transferred in.)

  • In this course students will begin drafting their Applied Doctoral Project under instructor supervision. Students will work individually on their Applied Doctoral Project drafts and their Project Justification drafts, focusing on the description of their project, refinement of their research questions, and a draft of their review of the literature. Students are encouraged to work closely with their chair during this course.

  • In this course students continue drafting their Applied Doctoral Project and Project Justification from Applied Doctoral Project Planning I. Students will further refine the description of their topic, their review of the literature and their Project Justification. At the end of this course, students should have a Project Justification in close to its final form.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

4

Year 4

 
  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

  • Students completing the Applied Doctoral Project must complete a minimum of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook. *Students satisfactorily progressing through the ADP experience, but not meeting the required milestones in the designated timeframe, will be required to reenroll in the corresponding ADP experience, Students needing more than two reenrollments in any of the ADP courses will need to appeal to enroll in the Applied Doctoral Project Extension, RES 8986/8987 to remain in the program and complete the designated milestone(s). Prerequisites: completion of all required coursework and Applied Doctoral Project Planning II.

Program Requirements

To be awarded the doctor of psychology, you must complete the program coursework of 62 credits with a 3.0 minimum cumulative grade point average. You will need to complete three non-credit In-Residence Workshops.* You will also need to complete all Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation requirements.**

*For the Doctor of Psychology, you are required to attend three In-Residence workshops as defined in the University Academic Catalog.

**As a requirement for graduation from the University of Arizona Global Campus with a degree of Doctor of Psychology (PsyD), each student must complete and successfully defend an Applied Doctoral Project (ADP) or Dissertation. The ADP is intended to extend or apply research by examining an issue within a real-world setting for a practical situation, leading to many different forms of studies that are different than the traditional dissertation. An ADP may look a lot like a dissertation study, or it can be a meta-analysis, a program design, program evaluation, a theoretical work, an action research, or a case study. The purpose of the Dissertation is to ensure that the student has mastered the ability to pursue a systematic investigation, which examines significant issues or problems in applied psychology. The Dissertation requirement is also designed to contribute to the student’s knowledge, skills, and research expertise in psychology. Students choose a topic that addresses carefully chosen research questions that the student then investigates with quantitative or qualitative research, with a meta-analysis, or with a program design or program evaluation. Prerequisites, timelines for completion, and attendance requirements for an Applied Doctoral Project and Dissertation, as well as a detailed explanation of each step in the process, are described in the Applied Doctoral Handbook and the Dissertation Handbook

Special Terms and Conditions

The Doctor of Psychology program is not a licensure program. The University of Arizona Global Campus cannot confirm whether its courses or programs meet requirements for professional licensure in your state. For information regarding professional licensure requirements in your state, you should contact the applicable licensing board or agency in your state and determine whether the program meets requirements for licensure in the state where you reside.

Certain degree programs may not be available in all states.

While the University of Arizona Global Campus does not collect applicant criminal background, certain criminal histories may prevent students from obtaining licensure, certification or employment in their chosen field of study.

Customize Your Psychology Degree with UAGC Specializations

Customize your online doctorate in psychology by selecting a specialization that aligns with your interests. Each specialization is 21 credits. Please note that there are unique disclosures associated with the Sport and Performance Psychology specialization that can be accessed directly from the specialization page below. Learn more about all of the Doctor of Psychology specializations:
  • Investigate the psychology behind crime with the Doctor of Psychology (PsyD), Criminology and Justice Studies specialization from the University of Arizona Global Campus. With this criminology and justice studies specialization, you will develop your expertise in criminal behavior, as well as the criminal justice and corrections systems. The goal of the specialization is to help you use psychological principles to find real-world solutions to complex issues regarding crime and justice. Be a practitioner and scholar in law enforcement and corrections and take your doctorate further. Your criminology and justice specialization may require prerequisite course work. Please talk to your advisor for more information.

    Learn More

  • Foster healthy organizations and workplace environments that allow employees to thrive with the Health and Wellness Psychology Specialization from the University of Arizona Global Campus. This program will help you develop the skills to enhance employees’ nutrition, exercise, and work-life balance. Go beyond prevention to encourage thriving in all aspects of life. Your specialization may require prerequisite course work. Please talk to your advisor for more information.

    Learn More

  • Empower teams and individuals to be their best with the Sport and Performance Psychology specialization from the University of Arizona Global Campus. This graduate program represents the height of performance enhancement education in sports, and its ultimate goal is for you to create actualization, awareness, self-mastery, and peak experience for both groups and individuals in your practice. Perfect the techniques that make people more effective in their sport. Your Sport and Performance Psychology specialization may require prerequisite course work. Please talk to your advisor for more information.

    Learn More

Careers in Psychology

Your degree in psychology can work in a variety of fields, including mental health, education, business, health care, counseling, and social and human services. Furthermore, if you have also acquired several years’ experience in business and industry, you can obtain jobs in consulting and marketing research.

 

If you earn a Doctor of Psychology (PsyD), you may choose to pursue the following careers:

 

  • Psychologist
  • Human Resources Specialist
  • Postsecondary Business Teacher
Psychologist talking to client Psychologist talking to client

Other Degrees That May Interest You

Check out other degree programs that suit a variety of interests and may enhance a wide scope of career opportunities at UAGC. Discover similar programs to find the right path for you.

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This program requires you to be a current licensed registered nurse. Please check out other programs to reach your education goals such as the BA in Health and Wellness.