What is a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology?

See the world through the lens of different cultures and communities when you earn a bachelor’s in sociology. In this program, you will explore the social behavior of varying groups, cultures, organizations, and social institutions while seeking to gain an understanding of why people think, feel, and behave the way they do. As a sociology major, you will study social theory and social structures, research methods, and social policy while exploring a variety of concepts including social responsibility, diversity, and human rights to gain a better understanding of the structure of groups, organizations, and societies.

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Degree Completion Journey

Engage in the study of humans in their collective aspects in society as well as their membership in identity groups and social class. Tackle such areas as social issues, identity group experiences, social inequality, discrimination, community, and aging. Learn how to statistically measure and analyze sociological research data to further understand the experiences of humans in social contexts. By taking such a variety of courses, you will be exposed to learning opportunities that will help you develop a proficiency in written communication, research methods, information analysis, evidence-based decision, and policy making.

1

Freshman Year

  • In this foundational course, students explore the principles necessary for achieving personal and career success. GEN 101 serves as a road map, guiding students as they begin their academic journey. Through self-discovery, surveying available resources, connecting with UAGC groups, and engaging with Career Services, students learn the essential skills of planning and goal setting. Students apply their personal strengths, skills, and lifelong learning strategies to develop essential career competencies. By making these meaningful connections students gain a deeper understanding of how their education relates to their desired career path.  Congratulations on embarking on this college journey filled with growth, exploration, and endless possibilities! This course is not available for non-degree seeking students and is not available as an elective.

  • This course offers an overview of digital fluency as it applies to personal, academic, financial, and professional success. Students will analyze the impact of digital technology on personal, social, and diversity issues and will develop digital skills that will assist in achieving academic, personal, and career goals. An overview of digital media is introduced with practical strategies for application in personal and professional life.

  • Learn and use key, practical skills that are applicable at home, at work, and in all UAGC courses! As UAGC students progress in their academic journey, strategies for personal, professional, and academic success continue to develop. This introductory course takes a two-pronged approach to setting students on a path to success. It merges fundamental informational literacy concepts with essential resources and skills that prepare students for college and career. Students learn how to identify, locate, evaluate, apply, and acknowledge information obtained through UAGC Library databases and internet search engines. By applying the research process, students sharpen critical thinking skills and learn to use information ethically. The final project is a practical and relevant opportunity for students to apply their learning in personally, professionally, and academically meaningful ways.

  • ENG 121 is designed to introduce students to the standards of writing in both academic and professional settings. The class will operate by first introducing, and then allowing students to practice, several written communication skills. Throughout, we will work to understand writing as a process, one that is strengthened through critical thinking, deepened by research, and built on a foundation of professional standards. Students will articulate a sense of their own skills and goals, and engage in collaborative conversations with peers and their instructor so as to be able to express their ideas more effectively. During the course, students will use the writing process to scrutinize their own perspectives while challenging them to embrace a wider conversation.

  • This course is designed to expand students’ appreciation of film and knowledge of how films are made. Through analysis of storytelling in a visual medium, students will examine the ways in which movies are shot, develop characters, evoke emotion, depict physical reality, reflect society, and have the power to influence it. Though the focus of the course is film itself, students will gain deeper intercultural fluency while growing their skills in critical thinking, written communication, and visual analysis.

  • This course is a study of correct and incorrect reasoning involved in everyday activities. The fundamentals of language and argument, deductive and inductive reasoning and other aspects of practical reasoning are examined. 

  • This course examines and evaluates theories and arguments concerning ethics and moral reasoning from a philosophical perspective. By engaging with historical and contemporary sources, students will analyze theories about the meaning, nature, and justification of ethical concepts; determine and assess how different forms of moral reasoning apply to contemporary moral issues; become more reflective and informed about their own moral beliefs; and develop their capacity for critical practical reasoning.

  • In this course, students will develop and expand their research and writing skills to communicate ideas in informed, ethical, and persuasive written documents intended for a range of audiences across a range of situations and contexts. Students will receive instruction and practice in synthesis and analysis, bolstering their written communication skills with a thorough understanding of academic research while honing critical thinking skills and effective work habits. Through writing well-structured, logical, and effective academic essays, students will explore tools and develop topics in a way that is meaningful to academic and professional lives. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 121 or equivalent with a grade of “C-” or better.

  • This course is designed to aid students in understanding the dynamics of interpersonal relationships. Verbal and nonverbal communication patterns among people in personal, social, academic, and professional settings will be examined, within and between cultures, including both face-to-face and technologically mediated channels.  The nature of these interactions will be evaluated using contemporary communication theory. The course will enable students to identify their interpersonal communication skills and behaviors and to more critically evaluate their own oral communication and that of others. The primary goals of the course are to improve the quality of students’ communication in their personal and professional relationships, to enhance students’ experience and. confidence with oral communication, and increase awareness of the importance of interpersonal communication that is inclusive and equitable.

  • A survey of government at the national level. Emphasis is placed on the constitutional basis of American government, federalism, the sources and forms of political behavior, the operation of the three branches of government, and the making of national policy.

2

Sophomore Year

  • Students explore culture in its role of guiding human behavior and providing social order, structure, and stability for individuals and groups of people. Culture is presented as a system of adaptation involving beliefs, behavior, language, customs, socio/political strategies, traditions, and technology that evolve over time. Recommended prerequisite: ENG 122.

  • This course focuses on sustainable development from a cross-disciplinary approach, including, economics, management, education, policy, and science. Students discuss sustainability conflicts at the national and international levels, and use online simulations to understand and evaluate sustainability practices.   Topics include zero waste, water management, smart growth, green technology, global change, renewable energy, agriculture, and land management.  

  • In this course, students will explore a wide range of Algebra topics. Topics will include study of linear equations, linear relationships, slope, polynomials, and functions, including graphing relations and solving systems of equations. Emphasis will be placed on developing an awareness of historical and current uses of algebra in real life settings, in various careers, and in solving important societal problems.

  • The capstone serves as an opportunity to reflect upon, integrate, and showcase learning achievement. Through discussions and course-embedded assessments, students will demonstrate a mastery of essential general education competencies as they relate to their personal and professional lives and provide evidence of growth through application of competency related skills to real-world situations. A minimum grade of “C-“ is required to meet course requirements. Prerequisite: 75 completed credits or permission of the student’s college or dean.

  • This Introductory course presents concepts, theories, and research in sociology. Intersections of identity and privilege are considered alongside relationships and the social construction of race, class, gender, and other forms of identity. Group organization and collective action are also presented in the course to explain human behavior and social change.

  • This course examines the major theoretical and conceptual explanations for social problems in modern society. Students will be introduced to a variety of current social problems in the United States and around the world, and will consider and suggest potential social action through the use of foundational sociological tools such as research, social theory and understanding of inequality and identity groups. The focus of the course is twofold: the critical analysis of the causes and consequences of these social problems from a sociological framework; and the considered social action through community action, using sociological tools.

  • Social theory refers to efforts to understand and illuminate the nature of social life. As such, social theory is not only the domain of sociologists. Contributors to social theory include economists, philosophers, psychologists, historians, activists, dramatists, essayists, poets, and novelists. Moreover, ordinary folks like us also theorize about social life. Social theories are crucial for helping us as individuals make sense of our daily lives, and they are essential to understanding new research, social practices and institutions. With the long-term aim of helping us better understand our lives and the world we live in, we will study what sociological theorists, have to say about the social world. The course covers key theorists such as Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Bourdieu and Foucault, Du Bois, Butler and Bauman and their seminal works, as well as the key social thought movements of Capitalism, Modernity, Alternative Knowledge, Self and Society.

  • This course examines quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods and associated data interpretation within the context of research, policy and practice within the social sciences. This course also examines the relationship between research, policy and/or theory. Students will examine types of data, measurement scales, hypotheses, sampling, probability, and varied research designs for research in the social sciences and related disciplines.

  • Descriptive and inferential statistics are investigated and multiple techniques for statistical analysis are introduced in this course. Formulas for presenting and evaluating data are explored in accordance with generally accepted protocol for statistical analysis. Prerequisite: MAT 232. Students in the RN-BSN program are waived from the MAT 232 course prerequisite. 

  • The course considers issues of identity, social inequality, and discrimination in society. The focus is on identities such as race and ethnicity, sex and gender, social class, culture, age, and ability, as well as the intersection between them. The focus is on these social categories as both elements of personal identity and sources of social inequality.

3

Junior Year

  • The course focuses on social stereotypes and prejudice against the aged, discrimination, friends and family, care giving, living environments, demography, senior political power, legislation, elder abuse, and death and dying.

  • This course is an examination of global socioeconomic development in the context of globalization. Topics include population growth, natural resources, sustainable growth, migration, diplomacy, and the global consequences of inequality, poverty, and war. These topics are examined through the lens of social expectations, gender ideals, and economic justice.

  • This course examines key sociological perspectives, concepts, and current research related to race and ethnicity. Its primary focus includes the social construction of race and ethnicity, patterns of inequalities and discrimination on the basis race and ethnicity, and the ways in which key social institutions impact and are impacted by race and ethnicity. Also covered are current issues related to immigration, inter-group relations, and how race and ethnicity are shaped by other systems of inequality such as gender, class, nationality, and culture.

  • This course is an introduction to gender and sexuality studies from a sociological perspective. Its primary focus is critical perspectives on the social construction of gender and sexuality, inequalities on the basis of gender and sexuality, activism around issues of gender and sexuality, and how gender and sexuality shape and are shaped by other systems of inequality such as race, ethnicity, class, culture, and age. Also covered are key sociological discourses in the areas of feminism, masculinities, and queer theory.

  • This course engages applied and public sociological frameworks to train students to work toward social change in their communities and society. The course helps students identify how social forces in everyday life impact the lives of individuals, groups, communities, and societies and what part they may play in those forces through social institutions to which they belong. By engaging in sociology, students will recognize issues of stratification and discrimination related to gender, race, class, sexuality, religion, and other social identities and discover ways these identities intersect. The course will also review a sampling of career opportunities in applied sociology, such as journalism and media, nonprofit work, health and human services, marketing, government, demography, social research, and others. Prerequisites: SOC101, SOC333, and SOC301 or ANT340, ANT351, ANT353 and ANT 340. This course is not available for non-degree seeking students.

4

Senior Year

Program Requirements
Credit Breakdowns
General Education
43
Credits
Major Credit Requirements
33*
Credits
Electives
50
Credits
Total Credits
120
Credits

To earn your Bachelor of Arts in Sociology at the University of Arizona Global Campus, you must complete 120 credits. You will need to complete 30 upper-division credits, of which 18 credits must be from the major program. A total of 30 credits must be completed at the University of Arizona Global Campus to meet the residency requirement. You may be able to transfer approved credits from community colleges, other previous college coursework, or other life experiences such as military service or job training toward your degree.

*In this program, 6 credits from the major may also satisfy General Education requirements.

Special Terms and Conditions

Successful completion of this program by itself does not lead to licensure or certification in any state, regardless of concentration or specialization. Further, the University of Arizona Global Campus does not guarantee that any professional organization will accept a graduate’s application to sit for any exam for the purpose of professional certification. Students seeking licensure or certification in a particular profession are strongly encouraged to carefully research the requirements prior to enrollment. Requirements may vary by state. Further, a criminal record may prevent an applicant from obtaining licensure, certification, or employment in this field of study.

Certain degree programs may not be available in all states.

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The Online Learner Support Certification recognizes programs that provide all the critical student and academic services needed for learner success and use learner feedback to continuously improve those services.

Customize Your Sociology Degree with UAGC Emphases

An emphasis provides you with additional opportunities to broaden and enrich your education that is distinct from and enhances your major. It may be taken as a way to expand career options, to prepare for graduate study, or simply to explore in greater depth an area different from your major. An emphasis consists of 9 to 12 credits.
  • Do you have an interest in studying important questions like how a country builds wealth and what policies help economies grow? If so, the Business Economics emphasis may be for you! This emphasis provides the critical knowledge you need to understand the impact of the economy on businesses, individuals, and the global community. Learning economic concepts will assist you in understanding how to analyze scarce resources, how to structure effective consumer incentives, and how public policies may impact an economy. Finally, the Business Economics emphasis includes topics such as profit maximization, international trade, and how to solve contemporary business problems in a global environment. The following courses are a part of the emphasis:

    Undergraduate Business Economics Emphasis Courses

    ECO 320 International Economics

    3 Credits

    This course will focus on the global environment of firms with particular emphasis on economic variables such as GDP, inflation, interest rates, and exchange rates. Topics include international trade, international finance, and regional issues in the global economy.

    ECO 406 Business Cycles & Growth

    3 Credits

    Topics include analysis of economic fluctuations and their impact on corporations and consumers; different explanations for business cycles; monetary and fiscal policy for stabilizing economic fluctuations; effects of public debt, investment, employment and trade policy on economic growth. Prerequisite: ECO 203.

    ECO 408 Managerial Economics

    3 Credits

    This course will focus on the application of economic principles and analyses to contemporary business problems and managerial decision making. Emphasis will be given to price and production decision making for profit maximization, investment decision making for a new project, strategic decision making in various business situations, and decision making with risks and uncertainty. Prerequisite: ECO 204.

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  • The Cognitive Studies emphasis is designed to introduce you to the study of the brain and how we learn, solve problems, and make decisions. You will discover the unique needs of learners with cognitive delays, as well as programs to address those needs. You will also learn to identify changes in brain development over time and analyze their impact on cognitive functions.

    Undergraduate Cognitive Studies Emphasis Courses

    EDU 411 Reading & Cognition

    3 Credits

    The task of learning to read is a very complex process involving the application of perceptual, sensory, linguistic, and cognitive skills to making meaning of text. Exploration of the specific cognitive functions that are applied while reading and strategies supporting reading instruction and reading comprehension skills will be addressed. The implications of digital media on reading skills will also be explored in this course.

    PSY 317 Cognitive Functioning in the Elderly

    3 Credits

    This course will introduce changes both cognitively and physically, that occur in both healthy and pathological aging. This course will emphasize changes in functioning, learning, language-processing, decision-making, memory, and reasoning in older adults Prerequisite: PSY 101 or equivalent.

    PSY 323 Perception, Learning, & Cognition

    3 Credits

    Students will study research and theory about mental processes that go between experience and the human mind. Students will gather and interpret data for several simple experiments that demonstrate classic research findings in perception, learning, and cognition. Perception entails the mental processes involved in the organization and interpretation of sensory experience. Learning entails relatively permanent changes in behavior that result from experience. Cognition explains how the mind processes information, how we encode, store, and retrieve memories, and how we use information to form beliefs, make decisions, and solve problems. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or equivalent.

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  • Perhaps you want to be your own boss, or you enjoy out-of-the-box thinking, solving puzzles, resolving problems, and finding creative ways to address issues in the current business environment. The Entrepreneurship emphasis may be just what you are looking for. This emphasis can help you visualize and realize skills you will need to succeed in a global business environment. It enables you to craft a foundation of skills and essential knowledge to build a business from its inception and transform it into sustainable growth. You will learn how to analyze risk, address and analyze the impact of various environmental factors in the political and ethical realm, and learn to design and compile business plans. The following courses are part of the emphasis:

    Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Emphasis Courses

    BUS 362 Introduction to Entrepreneurship

    3 Credits

    This dynamic course is based on a unique model of entrepreneurial methodology developed by Forbes School of Business and Technology at the University of Arizona Global Campus. Entrepreneurship encompasses imagining the unknown, taking inspired action, and embracing uncertainty to create a new future. It involves the identification, evaluation, and exploitation of opportunities to address challenges and to solve problems. Students will learn how to use imagination, creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship to bring new ideas to fruition that inspire others. Students will create a feasible blueprint for a venture opportunity idea of their own. This course will be the beginning of the journey to becoming an entrepreneur.

    BUS 433 New Business Strategy

    3 Credits

    This course is intended to provide prospective entrepreneurs with information and tools for evaluating opportunities for starting a new firm—how to choose markets for entry, when to enter, and what resources and capabilities it will take to enter and provide a platform for future growth. Prerequisite: BUS 362.

    BUS 437 Business Plan Development

    3 Credits

    BUS 437 students will use prior learning to create a comprehensive business plan for a new venture. The emphasis is on using a systematic four-step method to frame business plan development activities. Each week student teams will develop one segment of the team’s business plan and receive feedback from the instructor through a game simulation. Prerequisites: BUS 362.

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  • Do you have an interest in learning how to lead a healthier lifestyle, exploring the benefits of behavior change, and diving into how to better manage stress? If so, the Health and Wellness emphasis may be for you! The Health and Wellness emphasis examines the dimensions of wellness and the relationship of chronic conditions to preventive measures and treatment interventions. This emphasis can help you gain skills to promote health and wellness behaviors on an individual level by evaluating lifestyle factors and developing personalized wellness programs that utilize evidenced-based theories and strategies. The following courses are a part of the emphasis:

    Undergraduate Health and Wellness Emphasis Courses

    HWE 200 Introduction to Health & Wellness

    3 Credits

    This course provides students with a holistic overview of the multi-faceted dimensions of health and wellness across the lifespan. The seven dimensions of health: Physical, social, intellectual, emotional, occupational, spiritual, and environmental are explored within the context of a wellness lifestyle.

    HWE 340 Exercise & Physiology

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to physiological responses to exercise in the human body. Students compare the major physiological systems (energy transfer, cardiovascular, respiratory, neuromuscular, etc.) at rest, explain the systemic adaptations that occur with acute and long-term exercise, and evaluate how these activities affect health and human performance. Students also analyze how nutrition and pharmacological aids impact athletic performance.

    HWE 415 Stress Management

    3 Credits

    This course provides students with a basic understanding of stress management concepts including causes and effects of acute and chronic stress as well as techniques used to manage stress. Students learn about the effects of stress, analyze the relationship between stress and health, apply stress management techniques, and develop stress management programs while considering various cultural backgrounds.

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  • In the Real Estate Studies emphasis you’ll learn the ins and outs of a fascinating industry and prepare for examining the markets and financing methods for residential and commercial properties. Discover the many trends that influence property valuations and learn the best practices to benefit and safeguard investors. These three courses comprise the Real Estate Studies emphasis:

    Undergraduate Real Estate Studies Emphasis Courses

    RES 301 Principles of Real Estate

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to the general principles of real estate, to include industry terminology, ethics, deeds, listing and purchase agreements, agency, contracts, and property valuation decisions. Emphasis will also be on factors impacting local and national real estate markets.

    RES 325 Real Estate Practice

    3 Credits

    This course examines the basic job functions of real estate salespersons and brokers. Property listing, advertising, escrow, sales, and establishing a client base will be covered with practical applications for completing successful transactions.

    RES 345 Legal Aspects of Real Estate

    3 Credits

    This course is a study of the legal system and its impact on purchase, ownership, sale, and leasing of real estate. Topics to be covered include contracts, wills, zoning, and environmental law, as well as Constitutional issues in real estate

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  • Courses within the Supply Chain Management area of emphasis highlight effective management of supply chain processes and information flow in order to optimize activities and costs, and successfully serve their customers. You will study individual functions of supply chain and strategic relationships among these functions, which include: purchasing, inventory control, warehousing, quality, sustainability, financial controls; importing, exporting, trade agreements, contract negotiations, and transportation. You will learn to apply the core business knowledge to managing wider organizational processes. The following three courses comprise the Supply Chain Management area of emphasis:

    Undergraduate Supply Chain Management Emphasis Courses

    MGT 323 Principles of Supply Chain Management

    3 Credits

    This course introduces supply chain management, and the related costs. It provides a systematic overview and analysis of the elements of supply chain functions in widely varying types of industries and agencies, including handling, warehousing, inventory control, and financial controls. Prerequisite: MGT 330.

    MGT 370 International Supply Chain Management

    3 Credits

    Topics covered in this course include the government’s role in global logistics, the global logistics environment, ocean and air transportation, transportation to Canada, Mexico, and the European continent including intermediaries, documentation, insurance, exporting, and importing. Current trends in globalization will also be explored and evaluated. The role of logistics and transportation organizations in the global supply chain process will be discussed.

    MGT 400 Logistics Management

    3 Credits

    This course is an overview of logistics management in the modern business environment. It examines financial and economic aspects of logistics and highlights the value created by logistics activities. Students will evaluate transportation and warehousing management strategies. The course takes a practical approach to logistics and applies innovative logistics principles to business situations. The course examines contemporary topics, including the role of inventory, that support the organization’s strategic goals. Prerequisite: MGT 300.

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Careers in Sociology

When you complete your Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, you may choose to enter an organization or institution in social research or analyst role, work in the public, human and social services, as well as work in workplace and community advocacy and activism positions.

Specifically you may consider a career in any of the following areas in which the concepts of sociology can be applied:

  • Social Science Research Assistants
  • Social and Human Service Assistants
  • Community Health Workers
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Colleges and universities
  • Corporations
  • Non-profit and Public organizations
Group of people in a discussion Group of people in a discussion

Other Degrees That May Interest You

Check out other degree programs that suit a variety of interests and may enhance a wide scope of career opportunities at UAGC. Discover similar programs to find the right path for you.

What are the Benefits of Studying Sociology?

Choosing an online degree program can sometimes be an overwhelming journey, as there are a variety of different factors to take into consideration. A bachelor’s degree in sociology is a multifaceted subject area that can prepare you with transferable and marketable skills that can benefit you across many different industries. More importantly though, studying sociology can provide you with a better understanding of society in all its diversity, such as:

  • The unique experiences of identity groups and social inequality in society
  • The way social change can specifically impact identity groups and collective society
  • How social structures, policies, and institutions impact the experiences of humans in society
  • How sociologists use research to understand social issues and influence policies related to society
Sociology Degree Why Choose UAGC

Flexible Online Classroom: Earning your sociology degree online gives you the ability to continue with your current responsibilities while attending college at the same time. Taking your sociology classes online can give you the flexibility to create your schedule so that you can complete your coursework more efficiently. Having a flexible online classroom can help you pursue your degree at any stage in your life, giving you more motivation to start back on the path to a higher education.

Relevant & Current Subject Material: This bachelor’s in sociology explores the study of society through research of the experiences of humans and their demographic identity groups in society. Your online sociology courses delve into relevant and current theories by offering you a variety of courses on contemporary social issues and traditional social institutions, as well as an in-depth understanding of the experiences of identity groups (race, gender, age, sexuality, etc.). Some of these topics include social relationship patterns, social interactions, and culture. Graduates will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of sociological concepts, apply theoretical perspectives, and critically analyze sociological issues. Your sociology courses from the University of Arizona Global Campus will teach you relevant and current subject material in order to help you achieve success in your professional career.

Qualified Faculty: The faculty members in this online sociology degree program have advanced degrees, and many have relevant professional experience. By combining advanced degrees with real-life experiences, the sociology faculty members can enrich your learning environment with information and knowledge that can be related to your professional career.

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