The University of Arizona Global Campus Catalog

Course Descriptions

Not all courses are offered in all modalities or with the same frequency. Please reference the academic programs sections of this Catalog to find a list of courses offered and/or required in each degree program. Course prerequisites may also be listed in the individual program sections.

Course descriptions that reference “successful completion” of a prerequisite course assume the student will have earned a grade of “C-” or higher, unless otherwise noted in the program requirements. Term offerings are subject to change.

Course Numbering System

While many courses cross lines between class levels, the following offers a general correlation between course numbers and grade levels:

                    Grade Level                          Course Number Range

                    Lower Division                       100–299
                    Upper Division                       300–499
                    Master's Level                        500–699/5000-6999
                    Doctoral Level                        700-899/7000-8999

The University of Arizona Global Campus awards semester credit hours.

ABS Applied Behavioral Science

ABS 200 Introduction to Applied Behavioral Science

3 Credits

This course provides an introduction and overview of the application and use of applied behavioral science. Basic terms and definitions are reviewed, and students are introduced to the varied components of applied behavioral science. Topics covered include definition of the field, sub-specialties, and real world applications, and aspects of the field.

ABS 300 Psychological Assessment

3 Credits

This course will survey instruments of psychometric assessment that are frequently used in education and clinical practice. Fundamental theory and research pertaining to the quantitative measurement of human traits will be reviewed. Psychometric instruments will include standardized neuropsychological tests, intelligence tests, and personality tests. Strengths and limitations of these instruments will be carefully examined. Prerequisite: PSY 101 and PSY 325.

ABS 415 Leadership & Ethics in a Changing World

3 Credits

This course examines leadership and ethics from a broad perspective, and includes an overview of key leadership theories. Students explore leadership characteristics and values as applied to ethical decision-making, and challenges, as well as in regard to their own lives. Also included is an exploration of future leadership trends in a dynamic evolving world.

ABS 497 Applied Behavioral Sciences Capstone

3 Credits

This course provides the opportunity for the synthesis and application of content learned throughout the degree program. Students complete a project that demonstrates application of concepts presented throughout the degree coursework. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the General Education Capstone course.

ACC Accounting

ACC 201 Principles of Financial Accounting

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to financial accounting for non-accounting business majors. Emphasis is on construction of basic financial statements from a given set of transactions that include accruals and deferrals, and use of financial statement analysis to evaluate firm performance and quality of earnings.

ACC 202 Principles of Managerial Accounting

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to managerial accounting for non-accounting business majors. Emphasis is given on the internal accounting methods of business organizations for planning and control. Various topics include determining accounting systems for manufacturing operations, cost-volume profit analysis, differential analysis and produce pricing, budgeting and standard costs, decentralized operations, and capital investment analysis.

ACC 205 Principles of Accounting I

3 Credits

Introduction to the principles and procedures of general financial accounting with an emphasis on reporting to individuals outside the organization. Development of accounting reports on an accrual basis. Students who successfully complete ACC 205 may waive ACC 201, in approved circumstances.

ACC 206 Principles of Accounting II

3 Credits

Primarily covers the principles of managerial accounting. Emphasis on reporting to individuals inside the organization. Major concepts include job order costing, process costing, budgets and standards, and statement analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 205. Students who successfully complete ACC 206 may waive ACC 202, in approved circumstances.

ACC 208 Accounting for Managers

3 Credits

This course is designed to explain how data can be interpreted and used by managers in making decisions. Additionally, this course introduces the student to the analysis and interpretation of financial reports.

ACC 281 Accounting Concepts for Health Care Professionals

3 Credits

This course is designed as an applied managerial and financial accounting course, designed to provide health care decision-makers with fundamental concepts of health care accounting practices and procedures. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Quantitative Reasoning core competency and Digital Literacy competency. 

ACC 305 Intermediate Accounting I

3 Credits

This is the first of three intermediate accounting courses. The course covers accounting theory and a review of the accounting cycle. Additional topics covered include net income and comprehensive income, cash flows and the time value of money.. Prerequisite: ACC 206.

ACC 306 Intermediate Accounting II

3 Credits

This is the second of three intermediate accounting courses. The first part of the course covers revenue recognition accounting theory. Additional topics covered include cash and receivables, inventory, long-term assets and liabilities. Prerequisite ACC 305.

ACC 307 Intermediate Accounting III

3 Credits
This is the third of three intermediate accounting courses. The first part of the course covers stockholder’s equity and investments. Additional topics covered include income taxes, leases, employee compensation, earnings per share, accounting changes and cash flows. Prerequisite: ACC 306.

ACC 308 Accounting Information Systems

3 Credits

This course serves to advance the knowledge of computerized accounting for service and merchandising businesses, the underlying differences between manual and computerized accounting, and build students’ understanding of the accounting cycle and business processes including bookkeeping, invoicing, billing, and business trends.

ACC 310 Cost Accounting I

3 Credits

Covers traditional “cost” concepts: factory overhead, cost accumulation, job order cost system, process cost system, joint product and byproduct costing, standard costs and variances. Prerequisite: ACC 206.

ACC 345 Leadership & Financial Analysis

3 Credits
The course emphasizes the leadership component of the accounting profession and the link of accountants as business partners and team leaders in organizations today. The financial analysis component is included to link the team and leadership concepts to providing information and analysis of key financial ratio indicators for the organization. Prerequisite: ACC 310

ACC 380 Accounting for Not-for-Profit Organizations

3 Credits

Examines the differences in accounting between not-for-profit and for-profit organizations. Accounting for funds including general funds, special revenue funds, capital projects funds, debts service funds, special assessment funds, internal service funds, enterprise funds, fiduciary funds, the general fixed asset group of accounts, and the general long-term debt group of accounts. Prerequisite: ACC 206.

ACC 401 Federal Income Taxes I

3 Credits

A study of federal income tax laws and their application to individuals, partnerships, and corporations. Prerequisite: ACC 205.

ACC 407 Advanced Accounting

3 Credits

Primarily a course dealing with combined business entities. Topics include mergers, acquisitions and combinations, consolidated financial statements, intercompany profit, changes in equity, international operations, and partnerships. Prerequisite: ACC 306 and ACC 310.

ACC 408 International Accounting

3 Credits

The course focus encompasses the global perspective accountants are exposed to regularly. Many firms conduct business abroad thanks to internet sales, and accountants need a broader understanding of the impact of these business transactions on the accounting and financial reporting activities required of today’s accountant as a team partner. Prerequisite: ACC 407.

ACC 410 Auditing

3 Credits

Principles, procedures, and standards of public accounting. Emphasis on auditor’s working papers and submission of audit statements. Prerequisites: ACC 306, ACC 310 and GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program. 

ACC 610 Advanced Federal Taxation

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to federal taxation for entities other than individuals. Topics include structure, regulations, administration and compliance of federal taxation in the US from the perspective of corporations, partnerships, S corporations, trusts and estates.

ACC 611 Advanced Tax Research

3 Credits

This course is designed with an emphasis on developing research skills related to complex tax issues. The focus is on interpretation of tax law and finding support for various positions on difficult tax issues related to a variety of business, personal and estate tax issues.

ACC 612 Advanced Financial Accounting

3 Credits

This course expands on the basic financial reporting concept with a focus on business combination reporting for corporations and partnerships, foreign currency transaction reporting and financial statement translation, and financial statement note disclosure.

ACC 614 Auditing & Fraud Detection

3 Credits

This course will cover the components of the auditing process with a strong emphasis on planning, risk assessment and gathering audit evidence. The course will provide a foundation in the fundamentals of assurance, attestation and auditing.

ACC 615 Current Issues in Advanced Taxation

3 Credits

This course is designed to focus on selected taxation issues relevant to today’s economic climate. Topics will vary based on changing tax law and current political climate with an emphasis on interpretation of new tax regulations and pronouncements.

ACC 616 Forensic Accounting

3 Credits

This course will cover the basic concepts of forensic accounting including identifying, detecting, and preventing fraud. There will be an emphasis on investigating documentary evidence, interviewing witnesses and potential suspects, writing investigative reports and testifying to findings.

ACC 617 Current Issues in Advanced Auditing

3 Credits

This course will examine current and advanced issues affecting the auditing profession. Topics will include the study of audit risk, corporate governance, audit planning and execution, special reports and assurance engagements.

ACC 618 Professional Ethics for the Accountant

3 Credits

This course will provide an understanding of the ethics and code of professional conduct provided by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). In addition, ethic guidelines and codes of conduct endorsed by other professional accounting organizations such as the Institute of Managerial Accountants will be introduced.

ACC 622 Accounting Information Systems

3 Credits

This course will include a review of accounting information systems application controls and internal control. Topics include hardware and software concepts, application internal controls, internal control procedures, integrated audit software, generalized general ledger software, Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) internal control requirements and required company and audit documentation.

ACC 623 Advanced Topics in Excel & Access

3 Credits

This course utilizes the Microsoft Access database management system and Excel spreadsheet tools to build the accounting system elements for each of the four main transaction cycles: revenue, purchase, payroll, and production. Access topics include creating and maintaining tables; designing, maintaining and querying a database; creating forms and reports; and using VBA procedures on a database. Excel topics include the use of functions and formulas of Excel with emphasis on accounting as a financial analysis tool.

ACC 624 Current Issues in Accounting Information Systems

3 Credits

This advanced course provides an in-depth study of Accounting Information System concepts including business intelligence solutions, computerized accounting, enterprise resource planning, information technology strategy, data integrity, security techniques, user interface design, and internal controls. Emphasis is placed on understanding how accounting information systems can ensure the accuracy and reliability of financial information and aid in the decision-making process of an organization.

ACC 626 Accounting in a Global Environment

3 Credits

This course will include the study of an entity reported as either a multinational company or an entity whose reporting obligations to stakeholders are located in a country other than that of the reporting entity. Conceptual and practical applications of accounting are investigated from a global perspective. Special emphasis is placed on managing multinational enterprises with respect to how accounting applies to global strategies and the key accounting issues that influence multinational decision making. In addition, a detailed investigation on the convergence of U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) are covered in this course. Also discussed are the effects of financial reporting, international taxation, and international financial statement analysis on a multinational reporting entity.

ACC 630 Advanced Government and Non-Profit Accounting

3 Credits

This course introduces specialized accounting principles applicable to state and local governments and other non-profit organizations. Emphasis will be on fund accounting and students will gain an understanding of the differences between private and public sector accounting.

ACC 640 Advanced Managerial & Cost Accounting

3 Credits

This course explores advanced managerial and cost accounting topics as they relate to problem solving skills for managers. Topics include activity based costing, activity based management, cost of quality, theory of constraints related to capacity planning and new emerging practices that support management decision making.

ACC 695 Accounting Capstone

3 Credits

This course is designed to bring together knowledge gained from the previous program courses and allow the student to demonstrate how the various components of an accounting system work together. Broadly the course encompasses complex accounting concepts, financial statement reporting, taxes, risks, information systems, auditing, business law, and ethics.

ACC 696 Tax Capstone

3 Credits

This Capstone course will integrate the knowledge learned from prior courses using comprehensive business/individual taxation problems. The course will examine principles and policies that underlie the tax systems and rules. Students will research complicated tax issues involving a variety of tax topics, including businesses, financial tax planning, estates and wills. The culmination of the course involves a complex comprehensive tax research case.

ACC 697 Audit Capstone

3 Credits

This course is designed to bring together knowledge gained from the previous program courses. Broadly the course emphasizes complex auditing concepts and will also encompass accounting concepts, financial statement reporting, taxes, risks, information systems, business law, and ethics.

ACC 698 Accounting Information Systems Capstone

3 Credits

This course requires students to use all of the skills and knowledge gained during completion of the program by applying them to contemporary information systems issues and problems facing the profession. Students will be required to apply accounting information systems to complex areas of accounting and taxation. The course emphasizes both the practical and ethical issues of the practice of accounting.

ANT Anthropology

ANT 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

3 Credits

Students explore culture in its role of guiding human behavior and providing social order, structure, and stability for individuals and groups of people. Culture is presented as a system of adaptation involving beliefs, behavior, language, customs, socio/political strategies, traditions, and technology that evolve over time. Recommended prerequisite: ENG 122.

ANT 202 Human Origins & Prehistory

4 Credits

This course will introduce students to the anthropological study of human evolution and prehistory. Students will be introduced to the theory of natural selection and to humanity as a member of the primate order. Topics covered will be the human ancestors, the Neolithic revolution, and how humans both differ and are similar to other primates. Prerequisite: Written Communication Competency and ANT 101 or Intercultural & Global Awareness.

ANT 234 Family, Kin, & Groups

3 Credits

The course explores kinship systems, ethnicity, neighborhood and other social arrangements in various cultural settings through the reading of selected ethnographic materials. Students will study the kinship on a cross-cultural and worldwide basis, beginning with immediate social ties in familial contexts to broad connotations in ethnic, national, and universal domains. Prerequisite: Written Communication Competency and ANT 101 or Intercultural & Global Awareness.

ANT 307 Anthropology of War

3 Credits

An examination of the nature of war, primarily as it occurs in pre-industrial societies, and a survey of the anthropological explanations regarding this phenomenon. Emphasis is on understanding the complexity, variability, and cultural embeddedness of war as it occurs around the world. Prerequisite: Written Communication Competency and ANT 101 or Intercultural & Global Awareness.

ANT 315 Material Culture: Archaeology and the Human Condition

3 Credits

This course examines the anthropological sub-discipline of archaeology, the study of the human past, looking specifically at the theories and methods used by archaeologists. Students will learn how archaeologists gather and use data, and how this information is relevant to contemporary society. Students will explore the history and background of archaeology, as well as how archaeologists approach such topics as the origins of inequality, gender roles, complex societies, and ethical issues such as who owns the past. Prerequisite: ANT 202.

ANT 340 Anthropological Theory

3 Credits

This course explores anthropological theory in a historical perspective focusing on the rise of a distinct anthropological perspective on the comparative study of human societies and cultures. The course will detail various theoretical models developed in the 19th and 20th centuries to explain the similarities and differences in cultural systems. Prerequisite: Written Communication Competency and ANT 101 or Intercultural & Global Awareness.

ANT 343 Language, Culture, & Communication

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the study of the relationship of language and culture, including examination of the characteristics and structural principles of natural language. After exploring the basic characteristics of sound, word formation, and sentence structure, these principles are applied to such topics as: language variation, language change, psycholinguistics, and pragmatics. Prerequisite: Written Communication Competency and ANT 101 or Intercultural & Global Awareness.

ANT 348 Native American Anthropology

3 Credits

This course examines the nature and distribution of North American Indian cultures from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Through the use of archeological, anthropological, and contemporary community studies, this course will explore the diversity of traditional North American Indian and Inuit cultures and the adaptation of indigenous peoples to America. Prerequisite: Written Communication Competency and ANT 101 or Intercultural & Global Awareness.

ANT 351 Anthropology of Religion, Magic, & Ritual

3 Credits

This course examines the nature of religious belief systems, myth and ritual, witchcraft, and magic and sorcery in various societies of the world. These behavioral and symbolic forms exist or have existed in virtually all human societies and cultures. In this course, students will study many different belief systems, define these entities; and develop an understanding of how they work in societies. The differences among traditions in nation states on cultures and political systems will be explored. Prerequisite: Written Communication Competency Written Communication Competency and ANT 101 or Intercultural & Global Awareness.

ANT 353 Anthropology of Gender

3 Credits

This course examines cross-cultural analysis of gender roles, while focusing on non-Western societies, using data from other societies to better understand the gender system of our own culture. Issues include status of women and men, the meaning of “femaleness” and “maleness” historically and in contemporary society. Gender roles, transnational migrations, social movements, international relations and religion are explored.

ANT 462 Anthropological Research Methods

3 Credits

The course introduces students to qualitative research methods. Students will learn techniques such as participant observation, informal and formal interviewing, archival research, and explore the connection between theory and methodology. The perspective guiding the course is qualitative research as an empirical, rigorous approach that analyzes and interprets social and cultural aspects of human life. Prerequisite: All 300 level courses required for major and GEN 499. Recommended Prerequisite: Senior Level Status

ANT 499 Ethnographic Study Capstone

3 Credits

This course will provide an opportunity for students to engage in a qualitative research project to practice the skills and concepts acquired throughout their programs. Particularly attentive to the problems of conducting ethnographic research in a changing world characterized by transnational ties, the course is meant to form the capstone experience for anthropology and social science majors. Prerequisite: ANT 462, no more than 12 additional credits required before graduation, and Successful completion of the General Education Capstone course

ART Art

ART 101 Art Appreciation

3 Credits

A survey course providing an overview of the history of Western Art and the principles of art as they relate to society. Students are encouraged to discover personal interests through their own research on historical or contemporary styles and themes in art.

ASH Academic Success Habits

ASH 101 Launchpad: Developing Skills & Strategies for Success

3 Credits

As a new student at the University of Arizona Global Campus, there are many things to look forward to on one’s academic journey. Beginning with this first course, students can look forward to acquiring tools and strategies for academic success. Students will apply personal strengths, skills, and lifelong learning strategies to career competencies, making a meaningful connection between their learning and their future professional work. The goal of this course is to enlighten and empower students personally, academically, and professionally.

AVI Aviation

AVI 200 Commercial Drone Pilot

3 Credits

This course prepares students to take the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) exam in commercial drone operations. Students explore FAA regulations to operate small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) for purposes other than hobby and recreation. This course examines the FAA Part 107 UAS classification, certification, and operating rules.

This course is not available NDS. Completion of AVI 200, does not lead to certification. Upon successful completion of AVI 200, students will be prepared to take the FAA Part 107. Once students pass the exam, they will be eligible for certification as a drone pilot. Certification is granted by the Federal Aviation Administration and not by the University of Arizona Global Campus. It is the student’s responsibility to locate an approved PSI Testing Center

BUS Business

BUS 105 Business & Academic Success

3 Credits

In today’s modern business world, professionals must have an understanding of the connection between organizational, leadership, and career success. Get ready to learn the foundational skills necessary for success, both as a Forbes School of Business and Technology student, as well as an organizational leader in a variety of settings. The focus of this course will be on understanding leadership as a highly valued commodity, developing leadership skills and styles, and using effective leadership skills to meet organizational objectives. Additionally, you will be introduced to the many learning resources available to the University of Arizona Global Campus students to support their academic success.

BUS 119 Principles of Personal & Organizational Leadership

3 Credits

This is a leadership skills development course. This course provides an overview and introduction to leadership principles and leadership applications in various organizational settings. It examines the concept of leadership, leadership styles, traits, and types, and the evolution of leadership behaviors observed during recent generations.

BUS 123 Business Writing with Confidence, Clarity, & Style

3 Credits

This course provides instruction and practice in writing clear, logical, and persuasive documents for business. Students will engage with the instructor, colleagues, course materials, and additional resources to explore the role of writing in business, to engage in the steps of the writing process, and to practice common forms of business writing.

BUS 201 Principles of Management

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the nature and problems of management and organizations, leadership and control. The relationships between the needs of the individual, the organization and society are examined.

BUS 202 Professional & Business Communications

3 Credits

In today’s modern business world, professionals must excel in verbal, written, and visual business communication practices, including electronic and in-person communication. Almost every job posting includes a requirement for proficiency in verbal and written communication. As a result, to move up in one’s career, it is a critical necessity to develop these essential employability skills. In this course, students will learn the techniques of effective and appropriate business and professional communications for speech, video presentations, emails, PowerPoints, Web content, professional networking, and visual representations of data and be able to apply these techniques to all professional and business communications.

BUS 215 Personal Financial Management

3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the field of personal financial management and planning, focusing on the tools individuals and families employ to manage their financial affairs.

BUS 226 Introduction to Personnel Administration

3 Credits

This course examines relationships and issues in personnel administration within a broad range of 
organizations. Students study personnel management, organizational development, recruitment and selection, performance management systems, discipline, and collective bargaining.

BUS 235 Introduction to Marketing

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to marketing principles, concepts and theories that define the marketing discipline. Basic marketing strategies relating to product, price, promotion and distribution, cultural trends, societal behavior, technology, and legal environments that influence effective marketing decisions are examined.

BUS 250 Corporate & Social Responsibility

3 Credits

This course explores philosophic perspectives for understanding the meaning of corporate responsibility in society, and considers the leadership roles of managers in implementing corporate and social responsibilities. Topics include uses of power, government regulations, environmental issues, employee rights and responsibilities, consumer protection, and ethical integrity.

BUS 303 Human Resource Management

3 Credits

An introduction to the field of human resource management. Topics to be discussed include 
communication, motivation, and management of personnel. The course will include a review of current standards and practices as well as the legal environment as it pertains to the human resource field.

BUS 307 Operations Management & Quantitative Techniques

3 Credits

A survey of relevant quantitative techniques commonly used in accounting, business, and information systems. Topics will vary but, typically, elementary probability theory and applications, decision theory, and linear programming are included. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of Quantitative Reasoning Core Competency.

BUS 308 Statistics for Managers

3 Credits

This course is a practical introduction to the concepts to the fields of statistics and its many applications in Descriptive statistics, Hypothesis testing, ANOVA, and Regression for business administration students with emphasis on Excel’s tools for statistical analysis. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of Quantitative Reasoning Core Competency.

BUS 311 Business Law I

3 Credits

Introduction to the legal environment of business in the United States. Examination of the Constitution, administrative law, contracts, agency, and the protection of competition, consumers, employees, investors, the environment, and international trade.

BUS 317 Introduction to Advertising

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of advertising as a promotional force with emphasis on institutions, planning, strategic practices, and tactical decisions made by advertising executives. It will also explore the various career opportunities including account executive, media buying, copywriting, production, and research.

BUS 318 Organizational Behavior

3 Credits

This course is designed to develop the student’s skills in the understanding of factors that affect how individuals and groups act and interact with one another and with management. It also looks at how organizations manage their internal environment with the aim of improving productivity, efficiency, and communications among members. Prerequisite: BUS 201 or MGT 330.

BUS 323 Risk Management & Insurance

3 Credits

In this course, students study identification and quantification of risk, the span of methods of handling risk, and common contracts for managing risk. Common commercial/industrial situations and personal risk management situations are addressed.

BUS 330 Principles of Marketing

3 Credits

The methods used by producers of goods and services to determine and satisfy the wants of society. An examination of external and internal environments that impact marketing decisions, the basic elements of a marketing program, and issues in ethics and social responsibility.

BUS 336 Marketing Strategy

3 Credits

The objective of this course is to advance the students ability to develop, implement, and critically evaluate the marketing strategy for a product or service. It will provide the conceptual frameworks and hone the analytical and creative skills that are necessary to define and develop superior value, persuasively communicate that value, profitably deliver it to a carefully selected target market, and sustain both the value and the profitability in the face of ever-changing customer needs and competitive offerings.

BUS 337 Principles of Retail Management

3 Credits

Principles and practices used in management of retail businesses. The course covers topics such as site selection, layout, organization, staffing, positioning, customer service, promotional techniques, and all aspects of the critical buying function.

BUS 339 Marketing Research

3 Credits

Study and analysis of the marketing information system. Includes the organizational characteristics of marketing research, basic tools and procedures, and management science applications.

BUS 340 Business Communications

3 Credits

Every aspect of contemporary business communications — from determining what information to communicate to processing information and sharing it — depends on technology. Students will learn to compose, format, and manage business letters, memos, reports, email, and resumes. Students will use software to access information and to evaluate the quality of the information they receive. Students will create electronic presentations to communicate information.

BUS 342 Financial Planning & Practice

3 Credits

This course is a study of the various aspects of family financial planning from the perspective of the 
financial planning professional. It introduces the legal and regulatory issues affecting financial planners, defines the client-planner relationship, and prepares the planner to conduct family financial analysis. Emphasis is on providing the student with the knowledge and tools necessary to help families make informed financial decisions.

BUS 343 International Marketing

3 Credits

Examination of cultural, economic, and political factors that affect marketing of goods and services worldwide. Emphasis is on adapting the marketing strategies of domestic marketers to international operations and the institutional structure that exists in international markets. Marketing strategies of firms operation within these markets are also examined.

BUS 350 Consumer Behavior

3 Credits

This course illustrates the psychological, socio-cultural, and decision-making aspects of consumer 
behavior. Students study behavioral concepts, motivation, and the role of consumer behavior in our society.

BUS 351 Integrated Marketing Communications

3 Credits

This course is designed to reinforce the concept of integrated marketing communications (IMC). It aims to increase students' understanding of the planning, implementation, and evaluation process of an IMC campaign. Particular emphasis is on the integration of key elements of the marketing communication mix (e.g., advertising, promotion, direct marketing, interactive marketing, PR and publicity, etc.). Students will also learn how different types of media are employed in IMC. Prerequisite: BUS 330.

BUS 352 e-Business

3 Credits

An introduction to the fundamental concepts used in e-business and e-commerce. This course identifies and describes the wide range of applications in business. It explains what the Internet is and how it can be used for business applications in a competitive environment. Through Internet labs, this course will compare various Web strategies of current businesses. Students need to be proficient in using the Internet to find information.

BUS 357 International Business

3 Credits

Students examine functional areas of business from an international perspective. The importance of differing cultural and political assumptions in business is also addressed.

BUS 362 Introduction to Entrepreneurship

3 Credits

This dynamic course is based on a unique model of entrepreneurial methodology developed by Forbes School of Business and Technology at the University of Arizona Global Campus. Entrepreneurship encompasses imagining the unknown, taking inspired action, and embracing uncertainty to create a new future. It involves the identification, evaluation, and exploitation of opportunities to address challenges and to solve problems. Students will learn how to use imagination, creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship to bring new ideas to fruition that inspire others. Students will create a feasible blueprint for a venture opportunity idea of their own. This course will be the beginning of the journey to becoming an entrepreneur.

BUS 365 Creativity & Innovation

3 Credits

This course emphasizes developing knowledge and skills of creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship. This iterative process transforms business opportunities into outcomes of inspirational value for customers and stakeholders alike. This practice based approach enables students to engage with obstacles as opportunities for devising unique solutions that create desirable, feasible, and viable outcomes. The course also examines how individuals can be innovative in organizations and the challenge of building creative, innovative organizations as entrepreneurs. Prerequisite: BUS 362.

BUS 368 Venture Capital & Banking

3 Credits

BUS 368 provides students the opportunity to gain fundamental finance knowledge needed to start, grow and value new business ventures. The emphasis is on using theory to inform practice rather than focusing on complex terms and calculations. Real-world case studies that demonstrate entrepreneurial finance concepts in action are used throughout the course. These concepts provide the foundation for obtaining financing and executing part of the management function of control when business-as-usual activities are evaluated. Prerequisite: BUS 362.

BUS 370 Organizational Development

3 Credits

The course overviews how, why, and when to integrate the behavioral sciences with human resources management principles to increase individual and organizational effectiveness. Students will also be introduced to many types of interpersonal, intra-group, inter-group, and organizational interventions that are used to effect comprehensive and lasting changes. Prerequisite: BUS 201,MGT 330 or HCA 459.

BUS 372 Employee & Labor Relations

3 Credits

The course provides students with both the common and complex issues related to human behavior in the workplace as it relates to employee relations, and an examination of relationships among unions, workers, management, laws and government regulation. Prerequisite: BUS 303.

BUS 375 Employee Training

3 Credits

This course provides essential managerial-level comprehension of training theory and its practical applications in the business and management environment. Students learn the functions and duties of training: trainer/developer, the identification and assessment of training needs, program design and development, selection of delivery methods and means of instruction, the implementation of training programs, and evaluation. Prerequisite: BUS 303.

BUS 378 International Business Law

3 Credits

This courses focuses on the legal environment associated with international commercial transactions, including an analysis of major Western and non-Western legal traditions and the supranational law of the European Community, a detailed analysis of the negotiation, formation, enforcement, and financing of international sales contracts, an analysis of international trade regulation, analysis of methods of regulating global competition, and of the protection of business property rights in international transactions.

BUS 401 Principles of Finance

3 Credits

Basic corporate finance is presented with the emphasis on risk and return, bond and equity markets,valuation of bonds and equities, present value analysis, internal rate of return analysis, and project analysis using the weighted average cost of capital. Prerequisites: ACC 205 or ACC 208 or ACC 281 and fulfillment of the Quantitative Reasoning Core Competency. (Equivalent to BUS 320.)

BUS 402 Strategic Management & Business Policy

3 Credits

A case-based course that discusses the set of managerial decisions and actions that determines the long-run performance of a company. The course includes environmental scanning, strategy formulation, strategy implementation, and evaluation and control. Prerequisites: GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program.

BUS 405 Principles of Investments

3 Credits

The study and analysis of securities and other forms of investments. Emphasis is on investment
principles from the manager’s point of view. Prerequisite: BUS 401.

BUS 410 Digital Marketing Essentials

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the theoretical understanding of the digital marketplace necessary to adapt to its many changes, while also equipping students with the skills they will need to perform vital functions of digital marketing. Prerequisite: BUS 330.

BUS 421 PR/Marketing Capstone

3 Credits

This course is designed to bring together the knowledge gained through the entire program and permits the student to demonstrate mastery in the various course competencies. Students are expected to apply and integrate a variety of skills, tools, and knowledge to assess real-world problems offering realistic solutions. Students will analyze, design, implement, and document an appropriate solution for a capstone project. The project should exemplify the student’s ability to apply program outcomes. Prerequisites: GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program. 

BUS 427 Sustainable Business Practices

3 Credits

Using readings and cases, students examine business strategies in response to and anticipation of opportunities resulting from shifting economic, political, and environmental conditions including social change, market failures, or interruption of business operations. Compliance and risk management strategies will be emphasized while emphasis focuses on business innovation and business sustainability.

BUS 430 Finance Seminar

3 Credits

Using readings and case studies, students gain understanding the types of analysis performed and decisions made by the financial managers of corporations, focusing on valuation concepts and managing for value. Students also explore specific financing and investing decisions made by the firm’s management to mitigate corporate risk using insurance and financial derivatives; valuation of real options; real estate investment decision; issues and methods of corporate financial management in an international environment. Prerequisite: BUS 405.

BUS 433 New Business Strategy

3 Credits

This course is intended to provide prospective entrepreneurs with information and tools for evaluating opportunities for starting a new firm—how to choose markets for entry, when to enter, and what resources and capabilities it will take to enter and provide a platform for future growth. Prerequisite: BUS 362.

BUS 434 Compensation & Benefits Management

3 Credits

This course reviews the fundamentals of wage and salary programs, including conducting salary surveys, defining compensable factors, adjusting pay structures, evaluating pay differentials, and relating pay to performance. Benefit programs and related employee incentive and service programs are also covered. Prerequisite: BUS 303.

BUS 435 Small Business Ventures

3 Credits

This course incorporates the concepts and practices of entrepreneurial methodology in developing the framework for a small business venture based on each student's individual entrepreneurial desires and goals. The course provides students with a unique opportunity for engaging in the practice of entrepreneurship that focuses on the creation of a feasible working prototype for an actual small business venture. Students will explore the application of sound management practices related to strategic planning, operating, financing, and launching a small business venture or operating family-owned and managed companies or privately-held firms. Prerequisite: BUS 362 (Completion of BUS 365, BUS 368, & BUS 433 recommended).

BUS 437 Business Plan Development

3 Credits

BUS 437 is a capstone course in which students use prior learning to create a comprehensive business plan for a new venture. The emphasis is on using a systematic four-step method to frame business plan development activities. Each week student teams will develop one segment of the team’s business plan and receive feedback from the instructor through a game simulation. Prerequisites: BUS 362 and successful completion of the General Education Capstone course.

BUS 439 International Human Resources Management

3 Credits

In this course, students will examine human resources practices in an international business environment. The course also addresses HR strategies and practices to increase organizational effectiveness and efficiency as well as international compliance problems faced by HR professionals.

BUS 441 Retail Pricing Management

3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of the issues and considerations in the pricing of retail products, illustrate the role of pricing and product management in achieving strategic retail business goals, and demonstrate the link between pricing and product management within the context of the marketing mix within the marketing management process. Prerequisites: ECO 204 and SRV 340.

BUS 442 Retail Merchandising

3 Credits

This course addresses the central issues of retailing business while emphasizing issues related to channel options available to the final consumer. The course features concepts applied to both store based (e.g., specialty store, department store, multi-unit retail) and non-store based (e.g., Internet and catalog) retailing channels.

BUS 443 Quality Management for Organizational Excellence

3 Credits
This course presents quality procedures and concepts for enhancing goods, services, and the entire business environment. Students will learn to view quality as the result of customer-focused processes. Tools to manage these processes focus on designing, monitoring, controlling, and improving the inputs, activities, and outputs involved in all business activities.

BUS 445 Total Quality Management

3 Credits

This course presents quality procedures and concepts for enhancing goods, services and the entire business environment. Students learn various methods of process control and acceptance sampling, including using control charts and sampling plans. Quality planning, assurance and control are covered as parts of a total quality system. Probability and statistical concepts are further explored as related to process control.

BUS 446 Production Operations Control

3 Credits

Students analyze production control requirements as applied to both "push" and "pull" production environments. Students will gain an understanding of the ideologies related to forecasting, planning, scheduling, and managing operations with regard to the important relationship between the supply chain and production control. Students further learn to capture data to produce goods and services.

BUS 450 International Finance

3 Credits

An examination of the international aspects of corporate finance and investing, the course covers balance of payments, foreign exchange with emphasis on exchange rate determination, exchange risk, hedging, and interest arbitrage, international money and capital markets, international financing, and international banking.

BUS 455 Internet & Social Media Marketing

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the use of the Internet and social media applications as part of an integrated marketing strategy. Students will be exposed to a variety of alternative media as well as other online marketing tools and strategies. The course will also evaluate how these tools fit into the marketing theoretical framework. Prerequisite: BUS 330.

BUS 458 Consumer & Family Finance Capstone

3 Credits

This course provides a link between the traditional advisement services (finance, investment, tax, insurance, retirement planning, trust planning) and the client’s life plan to manage financial affairs. As a final exercise, students complete a model financial plan for a mock client. Prerequisites: GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program. 

BUS 461 Decision Modeling & Analysis

3 Credits

An introduction to the application of management science techniques and statistical tools to business decisions. Students will learn the assumptions and techniques necessary to apply and to implement solutions from optimization and other decision science models. The focus of the course will be on problem solving, which includes problem definition, problem analysis, evaluation and choice of alternatives, and implementation and evaluation of the decision. Prerequisites: MGT 330 and BUS 308 or MAT 332.

BUS 495 Marketing Capstone

3 Credits

This course is designed to bring together marketing knowledge gained throughout the entire program. Students will demonstrate a mastery of marketing components by designing and developing a strategic marketing plan for a product or service. The plan will reflect an understanding of the real-world problems by offering realistic solutions to business-to-business markets as well as domestic and global markets. Students will formulate the marketing plan sustainably and responsibly by evaluating various concepts such as consumer behavior, environmental analysis, market research, marketing mix (product, price, place, promotion), and digital and social marketing practices. Prerequisites: GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program.

BUS 497 e-Marketing Capstone

3 Credits

This course discusses the elements of a marketing plan as they are applied in an internet marketing situation. Students will create an e-marketing plan, beginning with an environmental scan and progressing through product strategy, channel strategy, and marketing communication. Prerequisites: GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program. 

BUS 590 General Cost Accounting

3 Credits

This course covers principles of planning, measuring, recording, and controlling costs in different types of organizations. Key concepts will include cost records, cost behavior and allocation, inventory valuation, product costing, standard costs, responsibility accounting, and cost planning and control. Emphasis is placed on costing analysis, evaluation, and reporting in order to assist management with the decision-making process.

BUS 591 Financial Accounting & Analysis

3 Credits

This course is a study of how the firm’s management captures and uses financial information for reporting and analysis to both internal and external stakeholders. Various course topics include the accounting cycle, sources of the information contained in financial statements, time value of money, ratio analysis, the preparation and analysis of income statements, balance sheets, and statements of cash flows.

BUS 592 Financial Business Overview

3 Credits
The Financial Business Overview course will provide a thorough overview of the financial statements from a user perspective rather than a preparer perspective. A global perspective will be presented using both Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). Students will analyze statements using various techniques and interpret the financial statements to understand the performance of a business. The analysis will extend to include future decision making and strategic planning.

BUS 600 Management Communications with Technology Tools

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the University of Arizona Global Campus Graduate Business programs, with emphases upon conceptualizing communication and communication processes in the contexts of organizations and leadership. Emphasis will be on technology, theories and models, qualitative communication research methodologies, and research writing.

BUS 604 New Business Venture Management

3 Credits

This course focuses on the important aspects of starting a new business enterprise with emphasis on the challenges faced by the entrepreneur in initiating a business venture and directing its early development. The course also addresses the process of forming business ventures, the identification and evaluation of new venture opportunities, and the development of appropriate entry strategies.

BUS 605 Venture Capital & Private Equity

3 Credits

This course will examine the role of finance and the formation of financial strategies needed to support each phase of the business start-up. Sources of equity and debt capital along with entry strategies such as franchising and acquisition are examined. Alternative working capital, capital structure, and investment strategies unique to the start-up are presented.

BUS 606 Global Comparative Management

3 Credits

This course reviews management systems within their political, social, and economic environments with a global perspective. This course also emphasizes the managerial processes in a global business environment and provides a strategic assessment of the fundamental issues involved in the management of multinational corporations. Topics include comparative studies of practices of management in foreign nations and examination of the influences of culture on business operations.

BUS 607 Business Law for the Accountant

3 Credits

This course involves in-depth study of specific laws and practices as related to contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, commercial paper, secured transactions, real and personal property, estates, and bankruptcy.

BUS 610 Organizational Behavior

3 Credits

This course investigates behavioral factors that affect modern organizations and their management. Topics include group and team dynamics, organizational structure, motivation, leadership, power, and change management.

BUS 611 Project Planning & Management

3 Credits

This course introduces students to the art and science of project management as applied to different types of project situations. Topics such as project life-cycle management, project organizations and leadership, project team building, RFPs, proposals and contracts, techniques for project scope definition, work definition, estimating, scheduling, risk management, control and closeout, the project management methodology, and PM software are covered.

BUS 612 Advanced Project Procurement

3 Credits

This course emphasizes a hands-on approach to using project management knowledge areas to facilitate scheduling, estimating, tracking and controlling the schedule and costs of the project. A project baseline will be set so that actual schedule and cost variances can be compared to the project baseline and corrective actions can be developed to address the variances. In this course students will learn about the legal, ethical, and fiscal considerations in procurement and contracts. Students will examine ways of identifying, evaluating and mitigating risk in scheduling, cost control, contracting and procurement.

BUS 616 International Business

3 Credits

This course studies the major functional business areas in a global context. Taking into consideration socio-political structural differences, the multinational corporation is investigated with applications in management, finance, marketing and operations.

BUS 620 Managerial Marketing

3 Credits

This course examines the marketing function, focusing on the managerial application of marketing tools and methodology. Emphasis is placed on marketing decisions associated with allocating organizational resources including: product development and design, pricing, promotional strategies, and distribution-based activities. Course coverage includes the marketing concept, buyer psychology, strategic planning and implementation of marketing plans.

BUS 621 Leadership & Teamwork

3 Credits

This course provides a high-level learning experience that involves the analysis of leadership skills, models and practices, organizational settings, team development, global markets, and cultural factors impacting leadership. Students will focus on ethical considerations impacting leaders within modern organizations nationally and internationally. Students will utilize communication technologies to demonstrate communication skills useful to leaders.

BUS 622 Global Marketing

3 Credits

The Global Marketing course develops a comprehensive understanding of global competition. It focuses on the managerial application of marketing tools and methodology utilized in gaining global competitive advantage and creating socially responsible marketing strategies. It covers the analysis of various environmental forces in the global arena such as economic environment, political, legal, and regulatory climates, as well as trade, cultural and social environments. Emphasis is placed on tools and tactics used in the development of a successful global marketing plan including information systems, market research, segmentation, targeting and positioning, various global marketing strategies, and the four major components of a marketing plan: products and brand, price, channels of distribution, and promotion.

BUS 623 Human Capital Management Using Applied Psychology

3 Credits
The Human Capital Management Using Applied Psychology course will challenge students to think strategically about a company’s human assets and the potential global competitiveness that can be gained. The course will offer a view of applied psychology and an understanding of how and why people think and act. The course will also include practical application of human capital management topics such as recruitment, performance management, managing careers, diverse work force, training and development and retention. Importance will be placed on how to deploy human capital in an organization. Finally, emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues such as a flexible work force and predictive analytics.

BUS 624 Law & Ethics in the Business Environment

3 Credits

The Law and Ethics in the Business Environment course covers major areas of legal regulation, including anti-trust, consumer protection, employment and labor law, intellectual property law, environmental regulations, securities and contract laws. While studying the laws, students will be acquainted with ethical decision-making tools to enhance ethical thinking and problem solving in both domestic and international contemporary business settings. Emphasis is placed on active, experiential application of legal and ethical reasoning and analysis as applied in diverse cultural environments.

BUS 625 Data & Decision Analytics

3 Credits

The Data and Decision Analytics course will provide students with the knowledge on how to analyze and dissect data into useful information. Students will use a variety of skills, including data collection, data assembly, and data dissemination to provide a synopsis of organizational operations. Students will create a comprehensive data proposal and use data to come to operational and strategic decisions. Prerequisite: BUS 592

BUS 626 Global Economics & Political Influence (Featuring Steve Forbes)

3 Credits

The Global Economics and Political Influence (featuring Steve Forbes) course introduces skills and perspective necessary to understand domestic and international macroeconomic events. The course will provide an overview of macroeconomic topics including, unemployment, inflation, money supply, and the tools employed by the Federal Reserve System and the federal government to create and implement monetary and fiscal policies. This course will also include international trade and the foreign exchange markets. Finally, real life important policy debates such as government spending and taxes, social security, the role of government with contrasting views from Keynes and Hayek, the importance of a sound money system, and the causes of the Great Recession of 2008-2009 will be critically explored. Prerequisite: BUS 592.

BUS 627 Financial Statement Analysis

3 Credits

The Financial Statement Analysis course provides a detailed and comprehensive evaluation of the financial statements to aid in short-term and strategic long-term decision making. Accounting concepts will be studied from a manager’s perspective rather than a detailed accountant’s perspective to allow students to analyze and interpret financial results. Students will study both Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to gain an understanding of the basic accounting concepts and language. Financial ratios, horizontal, and vertical analysis will be calculated to interpret and understand financial statements. Students will have the opportunity to explore accounting concepts at the corporate level and apply several concepts at the personal finance level as well. Prerequisite: BUS 592.

BUS 629 Financial Budgeting, Forecasting & Analysis

3 Credits

The Financial Budgeting, Forecasting and Analysis course provides the concepts and tools to make sound comprehensive short-term and strategic long-term financial decisions. Topics include working capital management, capital budgeting, long-term financing, capital allocation, and international financial management. Importance will be placed on basic budgeting and forecasting as this is a critical management skill. Emphasis will also be placed on contemporary global issues such as Bitcoin, micro lending, crowd funding and green financing. Finally, the course will relate many of the corporate financial concepts to personal finances as there is an increased responsibility for individuals to manage their own wealth. Overall the course will aid in developing a financial intuition to help students make better financial decisions in both career and life. Prerequisite: BUS 592.

BUS 630 Managerial Accounting

3 Credits

This course studies the role and major functions of the managerial accountant within the organization. Students of managerial accounting should not only be able to produce accounting information but also understand how managers are likely to use and react to that information. The goal of this course is to acquaint students of business with the fundamental tools of management accounting and to promote their understanding of the dramatic ways in which the field is changing. The emphasis through the text and course is on using account information to help manage an organization. Some topics covered in this course include: cost management, various budgeting theories and techniques, and decision-making processes. Prerequisite: BUS 591 or equivalent.

BUS 631 Integrated Supply Chain Management

3 Credits

Study and analysis of supply chain management for products/services and the dynamic interaction of companies within an integrated supply chain. Topics include factors guiding companies’ supply chain development and management; Technology as a supply chain tool; Positioning of a company in terms of its role as a valuable member of the supply chain; and, performance measures used across the supply chain.

BUS 632 Advanced Logistics

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of current logistics and distribution practices intended to advance current knowledge. Students should gain an understanding of the significant components of logistics management and the dynamics of what is considered best practice. Focuses on the complexities associated with the integrated flow of raw materials, in-process goods, finished goods, and information from point-of-origin through the production process to the end consumer.

BUS 635 Media Markets & Systems

3 Credits

The course examines the various segments of the market that utilize media resources for organizational growth and communication. Examination of the components of media, stakeholders, markets available and cultures impacted by media will include assessment of technological and economic drivers that establish a congruent approach to the marketplace.

BUS 636 Media Management & Innovation

3 Credits

Utilizing the key principles of organizational management, this course will focus on the media approach in an organization and providing systematic guidelines for oversight of the institutional media team. Creating a culture of innovation in the media team will be a strategic element in the course content.

BUS 637 Entrepreneur/Intrapreneur

3 Credits

The Entrepreneur/Intrapreneur course examines key aspects of the roles of entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs within organizations. Both roles are important to the continued success and competitiveness of an organization. This course explores new and innovative ways for organizations to overcome challenges in their internal and external operating environments. Additionally, this course examines financial elements that are associated with new venture start-ups in addition to studying the ethical implication with global growth strategy. Students will focus on the internal activities of intrapreneurs and the external activities of entrepreneurs that can positively impact organizations as a whole and individual careers. Prerequisite: As this course is an elective option for the student in the MBA program, elective courses must be completed after all other major courses and prior to the capstone course.

BUS 638 International Business

3 Credits

The International Business (Virtual Experience) course is designed to offer students opportunities for analyzing information and strategies for conducting business in the international marketplace. The course will allow students to examine international business practice and their impact on the global market via business process analysis such as PESTLE, SOAR, and SWOT. In addition, the course will expand on students’ knowledge of international business strategies and procedures, global corporate social responsibility and current international norms. The course will also demonstrate the impact of financial risks and currency fluctuation on foreign investment. Lastly, this course will give students the opportunity to examine various cultures through interactive activities. Prerequisite: As this course is an elective option for the student, elective courses must be completed after all other major courses and prior to the capstone course.

BUS 639 Technology & Innovation

3 Credits

The Technology and Innovation course takes an in-depth look at innovatively driven organizations and the use of technology to advance in competitive markets. Students explore various products and processes within organizations in addition to examining stages of innovation and opportunity as synthesized with a corporate strategy. Topics include; structure and support of control processes in personnel, financial strategy and organizational culture. This course also explores avenues for acquiring technology through alliances and mergers in addition to studying sustainable competitive advantages with social, ethical, political and legal responsibilities with relation to integrating new technology into existing structures. Prerequisite: As this course is an elective option for the student in the MBA program, elective courses must be completed after all other major courses and prior to the capstone course.

BUS 640 Managerial Economics

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide a solid foundation of economic understanding for use in managerial decision-making. The course offers an intuitive non-calculus based treatment of economic theory and analysis. A variety of examples is used to illustrate the application of managerial economics to diverse practical situations. The role that economic analysis plays in that process is emphasized throughout this course. Prerequisite: MAT 540 or equivalent.

BUS 642 Business Research Methods & Tools

3 Credits

This course examines the use of quantitative techniques business decision-making. Using spreadsheet software, the course addresses managerial problem solving through the use descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, and correlation and regression (single and multiple) analysis. This course also provides a graduate foundation for conducting business research. Topic coverage includes: research methodology, literature review, hypothesis generation, data collection and summary techniques. Additional coverage includes study of qualitative and quantitative data as well as reviewing conceptual versus empirical research studies. Prerequisite: MAT 540 or equivalent.

BUS 644 Operations Management

3 Credits

This course focuses on the principles associated with the effective design, implementation and management of organizational processes and systems. With an emphasis on efficiency, course coverage includes: systems design for products and services, inventory management systems, distribution and supply chain management.

BUS 650 Managerial Finance

3 Credits

This course studies the role and major functions of corporate finance within the organization. Upon developing an understanding of the theoretical foundation of corporate finance, students will use financial tools in an applied case and problem format. Topics covered include: net present value analysis (time value of money), risk assessment, security valuation, decisions on capital structure and allocation, and the weighted average cost of capital. Prerequisite: BUS 591 or equivalent.

BUS 655 Financial Investment Management

3 Credits

The central focus of this course is to develop an understanding of how security markets function, factors that influence security valuation, differentiating between various investment types and understanding investment risk and return principles. This course covers security markets operations, investment information, portfolio asset allocation; financial environment analysis; and evaluation of equity and fixed income securities.

BUS 657 Corporate Managerial Finance

3 Credits

This course introduces the financial theory and practices firm managers use to attain their goal of maximizing corporate shareholder wealth. Topics covered are: analysis techniques of financial statement and cash flows; working capital management and financial forecasting; valuation methods for debt and equity capital; risk and rate of return theory; cost of capital, capital project budgeting decisions and cash flow estimation; optimal capital structure and dividend policy.

BUS 660 Contemporary Issues in Organizational Leadership

3 Credits

This course provides an in-depth examination of the multi-faceted concept of leadership studies by presenting the student with the vocabulary, concepts, theories, and applicable research that are fundamental to the understanding of leadership. The course examines contemporary and historical leadership issues, moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership, and leadership in a variety of contexts. Leadership as a social and political influence process is examined.

BUS 661 Leading Organizational Change

3 Credits

This course blends theories of leadership with concepts and models of organizational change. The change process consists of a series of steps that focuses on vision, implementation, change agents, and other internal and external components. The course provides insight into types of changes that impact organizations and possible strategies to effectively address those changes.

BUS 665 Environmental Law & Compliance

3 Credits

This course begins with an analysis of The Solid Waste Disposal Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Further, it will familiarize students with an environmental manager’s duties in permitting, reporting, record keeping and sampling. It emphasizes a systematic approach to identifying obligations with respect to regulated media and developing appropriate responses. Obligations under United States environmental laws, their relationship to state and local laws, and state and local obligations are considered as a model for analysis and response.

BUS 667 Energy, Environment & Economics

3 Credits

This course deals with the linkage of energy, environmental and economic issues. The impact of energy supply and end-use on human well-being and the ecosystem is covered. It also includes a comprehensive approach to the resolution of resource, technical, economic, strategic, environmental, socio- and geopolitical problems of the energy industries. In addition, pathways to a sustainable global energy system are presented.

BUS 668 Macroeconomics of Financial Markets

3 Credits

This course examines the monetary aspects of production, spending, borrowing, and lending decisions, organization, performance and scope of services provided by financial markets and institutions, and the powers of the Federal Reserve System to use monetary policy and limits to credit expansion. The regulatory and globalization aspects and relevance of market behavior to the financial system are also examined.

BUS 669 Managerial Economic Analysis

3 Credits

Managerial economics introduces the basic principles of economic analysis as applied to managerial decisions to determine how an organization can achieve its aims most efficiently. This course applies statistical and quantitative tools and the methodological approaches commonly used by economists to business problems as demand estimation, product pricing, profit maximizing level of output, cost minimizing level of input use, and forecasting.

BUS 670 Legal Environment

3 Credits

This course involves the study of business law, its foundations, and the role it plays in managing a business, with a particular emphasis on the corporate form. Topics of relevance to be explored include the following core concepts: constitutional law, case law, government regulation, ethics, contracts, anti-trust law, securities regulations, employment law, environmental law, and crimes and torts.

BUS 680 Training & Development

3 Credits

This course provides in-depth knowledge of training and performance development concepts essential for line managers or human resource specialists. Beginning with fundamental principles of performance, the course focus is on identifying critical factors in workplace performance and in determining how to analyze the causes of performance problems. Additionally, this course distinguishes between training and development and addresses their complementary functions in the modern organization.

BUS 681 Compensation & Benefits

3 Credits

This course provides in-depth knowledge into compensation theories, policies, systems, and practices, with particular emphasis toward designing effective compensation programs.

BUS 687 MBA Capstone

3 Credits

This course provides a personalized, directed, and experiential learning process that involves practical application of knowledge and skills developed and acquired during the MBA degree program. In this course, students will examine practical application of finance, marketing, human resources management, and information technology. Students are required to conduct research, analysis, and implementation of strategic plans related to business establishment, growth, and longevity. The course provides experience with ethical conduct associated within a socially-responsible business.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of MBA program core courses.

BUS 686 Capstone Strategic Simulation

3 Credits

The Capstone Strategic Simulation course is a culminating experience for the MBA program. The course focuses on the application of strategic and managerial tools critical for success in today’s marketplace. Students will manage and lead a startup enterprise through an on-line competitive business simulation. The simulation will integrate concepts learned throughout the program, emphasizing a crossfunctional framework that assesses short and long term strategies, as well as interpersonal and quantifiable skills. Students will have the opportunity to create a business strategy and operationalize decision making to achieve success. This capstone course must be taken last in the program.

BUS 688 Business Strategy: The Sustainable Enterprise

3 Credits

This course integrates environmental management issues with use of strategic planning tools for assessing and responding to the driving forces of the “next” economy: globalization, technology, demographics and the environment. The course examines the challenge of corporations competing in the global economy of the new millennium in such a way that will allow the planet to support them indefinitely. Emphasis is on the company’s ability to build and sustain a competitive advantage utilizing traditional management concepts as well as new sustainability practices.

BUS 689 Market Structure & Firm Strategy

3 Credits

This course focuses on the study of markets, laws, and government regulations used to smooth significant market imperfections, especially the problems caused by market structure and market power. The course further examines how firms formulate business strategies and activities to position themselves for profit advantage. This course is cumulative in nature, integrating knowledge and information attained while completing the entire MBA/Business Economics curriculum. In addition, the course project requires the generation and presentation of an industry economic analysis.

BUS 690 Business Strategy

3 Credits

This course explores the formulation, implementation, and evaluation/control of organizational strategic management. In the context of a globally competitive market, students will explore methods of directing an entire organization through applied case analysis. Topics include analysis of competitive position, value creation, development of system-wide goals and objectives, and creation of a strategic plan. This course is cumulative in nature, integrating knowledge and information attained while completing the entire MBA curriculum. Additionally, the course project requires the generation and presentation of an industry analysis.

BUS 691 Strategies in Organizational Leadership

3 Credits

This course builds on leadership, business, and management concepts. This strategy course provides the student with the opportunity to synthesize all prior learning in leadership and related coursework and experiences, both personal and professional. The course expands the leader’s thinking and explores the arena of leadership and how it will impact the future of the individual, the organization, and the world in which we live.

BUS 692 Strategies in Human Resource Management

3 Credits

This course examines how to manage human resources effectively in the dynamic legal, social, and economic environment currently impacting organizations. The course examines human resource management in the current business environment and develops alignment with vision, strategy, organizational values, and HR functions. Emphasis is placed on integrating human resource management with the overall business strategy.

BUS 693 Global Business Strategy

3 Credits

This course builds on the leadership, business, and management concepts while integrating a comprehensive look at strategic planning and management in a global environment. The course is designed to employ case analyses, critical assessments, global market evaluations, and a comprehensive strategic planning project to lead the student to fluency in the global strategic planning process.

BUS 694 Finance Seminar

3 Credits

This course will cover advanced financial topics including: International financial management, corporate risk management, merger and acquisitions, portfolio management theory and real options.

BUS 695 Marketing Seminar

3 Credits

This course builds on the leadership, business, and management concepts contained in the MBA program while introducing the principles and tools for managers to apply in the development, implementation, and review of marketing strategy for organizations. Topics include internal and external environmental analysis; value, competition, and strategic choice; strategic positioning; and implementation and control issues. In addition, the project requires the generation and presentation of strategic marketing plan.

BUS 696 Strategic Thinking for Entrepreneurs

3 Credits

This course focuses on application of key strategic and managerial approaches necessary for entrepreneurs to implement the strategy for a start-up or business takeover enterprise. It examines and discusses how entrepreneurial firms develop and implement innovative business plans, create functional operations, and incorporate technology strategies. Emphasis is placed on the vision of the firm, the strategic planning process, and strategic management. The final component is the generation of a business plan.

BUS 697 Project Management Strategy

3 Credits

This course focuses on application of managerial approaches necessary to align significant projects with organizational strategy. It examines and discusses how firms determine business benefits and project feasibility, report progress, and measure project quality while communicating with key organizational stakeholders. Emphasis is placed on Earned Value Management techniques and achieving project progress and technical performance of the project.

BUS 698 Supply Chain Strategic Management

3 Credits

This covers addresses the strategic implications of sourcing and supplier relationships in the context of supply chain management. Critical elements including identifying and selecting suppliers, negotiating contract terms and conditions, implementing contracts, and measuring performance in the context of the organization’s strategic plans are covered. Practical examples of sourcing excellence are provided.

BUS 699 Media Strategies & Applications

3 Credits

The course is designed to integrate media management concepts in to a strategic plan. The course is focused on building and implementing the media strategies for an integrated and comprehensive plan that is consistent with an institution’s vision and mission and follows standard strategic planning theory and practice.

CAH Complementary and Alternative Health

CAH 390 Introduction to Chinese Medicine

3 Credits

Introduction to Chinese medicine is the study of the medical system and healing practices traditionally used in China, and more recently, in the United States and other countries. The course endeavors to explore the conceptual framework of Chinese medicine; in particular, from a contextual and historical perspective. Additionally the course will focus on how Chinese Medicine understands the concepts of health and disease, creating context for how health imbalances are understood in the medical system. Prerequisites: HCS 321 and HCS 326

CGD Computer Graphic Design

CGD 218 Visual Literacy in Business

3 Credits

This course examines the evolution and trends in digital media utilized in business. Course content and activities focus on message content and creation and the visual principles and theories that shape effective visual communication in the business environment. Legal and ethical issues relating to visual communication will be introduced and incorporated into projects that develop visual literacy and visual problem-solving skills.

CGD 240 Media Writing & Editing

3 Credits

An introduction to the process of writing for varied media. Emphasis is on gathering information, writing styles, editing, and organization of written communication.

CGD 318 Public Relations Practices & Promotional Writing

3 Credits

An introduction to current procedures and duties of public relations personnel will be studied. Students will write news releases, brochures, speeches, reports, memos, scripts, and ad copy using workshop format.

COM Communications

COM 101 Introduction to Communication

3 Credits

This course serves as an introduction to the study of human communication. Students will examine classic and modern views of communication as well as theories and research relating to various sub-disciplines of communication such as interpersonal, group, organizational, mass and public communication. They will discuss and evaluate these theories and research findings and assess the impact of technology on the communication process. Relationship stages, theories, and contemporary views of “family” are examined, as well as the impact of family, culture, and gender on communication patterns. Types of groups and organizations are identified, as well as concepts of power and interaction in group, organizational, and public settings. Mass communication and its impact on individuals and society will be explored. In this class, students will also have an opportunity to examine the practical implications of these concepts in building their own communication skills as well as future career path.

COM 200 Interpersonal Communication

3 Credits

This course is designed to aid students in understanding the dynamics of interpersonal relationships. Verbal and nonverbal communication patterns between people in personal, social, academic, and professional settings will be examined, and the nature of those interactions will be evaluated using contemporary communication theory. The course will enable students to identify their interpersonal communication behaviors and to more critically evaluate their own oral communication and that of others. A primary goal of the course is to improve the quality of students’ communication in their personal and professional relationships.

COM 223 Persuasion in Communication

3 Credits

Students learn to analyze and evaluate persuasive messages and determine which contribute to effective and non-effective persuasion. Students formulate persuasive arguments and learn to deliver those arguments effectively, in a variety of forms. This course examines the purpose and function of research in supporting elements of persuasion and the need to understand receiver variables.

COM 325 Communication & Conflict

3 Credits

The course provides students with conflict resolution techniques through communication. Students will analyze the purpose of conflict, learn to work with difficult people, and understand communication as a significant factor in the development, management, and resolution of conflict at the interpersonal, small group, organization, and societal levels. Prerequisites: ENG 121 and ENG 122 or equivalents.

COM 327 Visual Communication

3 Credits

This course will teach students the importance of visual elements in communication, and how to effectively incorporate visual elements into messages for various media platforms. Students will also be introduced to communication fields’ standards related to the design of visual messages and the various software programs that are used.

COM 340 Technical Writing

3 Credits

This course provides students with technical writing concepts and principles and the skills necessary to compose effective technical documents for a broad range of professions. Emphasis is placed on making complex and technical information understandable to a variety of audiences. Students will explore types of technical documents and the specific techniques applicable to technical writing such as outlines, abstracts, definition, and classification strategies. They will have an opportunity to apply their knowledge by writing a process or mechanism description, a proposal/recommendation report, and a detailed instruction for performing a task or operation.

COM 345 Media Writing for Communication

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the process of writing for varied media. Emphasis is on gathering information, writing styles, editing, and organization of written communication.

COM 355 Technology & Communication

3 Credits

Students will be introduced to communication fields’ standards related to the design of visual messages and the various software programs within the field. This course will teach students the importance of visual elements in communication, and how to effectively incorporate visual elements into messages for various media platforms.

COM 360 Advanced Communications in Society

3 Credits

This course integrates the use of advanced communication techniques into a variety of contexts shaped by socially and culturally-constructed distinctions between and among individuals and groups. Topics include intercultural, multicultural, international, and inter-gender communications.

COM 370 Intercultural Communication

3 Credits

This course integrates the use of advanced communication techniques into a variety of contexts shaped by socially and culturally constructed distinctions between and among individuals and groups. Topics include intercultural, multicultural, international, and inter-gender communications.

COM 425 Communication in Organizations

3 Credits

This course investigates the role of communication in creating an effective and ethical organizational environment. Students will be assisted in developing and strengthening such communication skills as self- awareness, intrapersonal efficacy, interpersonal competence, and leadership and team skills.

COM 480 Communication Studies Capstone

3 Credits

This course is a summative compilation of representative work from each course in the program. Students will create an electronic portfolio containing the assignments completed throughout the program to demonstrate professional achievement. Students will complete a comprehensive research project on a selected career field. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the General Education Capstone course.

CPT Computer Technology

CPT 200 Fundamentals of Programming Languages

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students will learn fundamentals of computer programming including primitive data types, expressions, control statements, functions, and arrays. Students in this course will be using Python programing language. Python is a widely used high-level, general-purpose, interpreted, dynamic programming language. Prerequisite: INT 100.

CPT 301 Computer Organization & Architecture

3 Credits

This course provides students with an opportunity to form a strong understanding of the design and architecture of modern computers. In this course, students will learn the principles of computer organization and basic architecture concepts, including computer instruction, arithmetic of computers, and memory hierarchy and technologies.Prerequisite: CPT 200.

CPT 304 Operating Systems Theory & Design

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts and techniques for Operating Systems Theory and Design. Students will learn the operating system concepts including implementation, processes, deadlocks, communication, multi-processing, multilevel memory management, file systems, protection, resource allocation, and scheduling. This course is designed to provide students an overview of operating systems principles, implementations, and methodologies. Prerequisite: CPT 200.

CPT 307 Data Structures, Algorithms, & Designs

3 Credits

In this course, students will learn data structure foundations; concepts and features of object-oriented-programming, arrays, stacks, queues, lists; and trees. Students will analyze different sorting and searching algorithms. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate use and choice of standard data structures. Prerequisite: CPT 200.

CPT 310 Database Systems & Management

3 Credits

This course introduces the students to fundamentals of database design, modeling, and relational databases. Students will utilize the concepts to construct and test a database and associated application components. The developments of efficient database application systems require an understanding of fundamentals of database management system. Prerequisite: CPT 307.

CRJ Criminal Justice

CRJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 Credits

This course considers processes for law enforcement, the judiciary, corrections and juvenile justice. In addition, this course considers criminal justice issues, applications for criminology, and critical perspectives in the study of criminal justice.

CRJ 301 Juvenile Justice

3 Credits

This course describes prevalent patterns of juvenile delinquency, relates these patterns to theories of child and adolescent development, and examines various theories pertaining to the causes of criminal behavior among juveniles. In addition, the course surveys the roles of police, courts, and delinquency intervention programs in the administration of juvenile justice. Emphasis will be given to strategies of prevention and early intervention.

CRJ 303 Corrections

3 Credits

An analysis of correctional procedures and institutions, especially jails, prisons, parole, and probation is the focus of this course. Other topics include inmate subcultures, rehabilitation, and prisonization.

CRJ 305 Crime Prevention

3 Credits

This course explores strategies of crime prevention including programs designed to reduce opportunities to commit crime, programs to alleviate demoralizing community social and economic conditions that foster criminal behavior, programs to improve police/community cooperation, and programs to educate young people as to likely consequences of criminal behavior.

CRJ 306 Criminal Law & Procedure

3 Credits

A survey of constitutional rights, police compliance to constitutional rights, and constitutional amendments that specifically apply to the individual. The course examines the application of these rights in the enforcement, investigation, and adjudication of specific crimes.

CRJ 308 Psychology of Criminal Behavior

3 Credits

Introduction to the Psychology of Criminal Behavior provides an overview of the intersection of psychology and the criminal justice system. The biopsychosocial factors that may influence criminal behavior are examined such as aggression, psychopathy, mental health disorders, and brain dysfunction. Finally, appropriate psychological interventions are evaluated to determine the best course of action for predicting and treating criminal behavior in both juveniles and adults.

CRJ 310 Applied Constitutional Issues

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to constitutional rights and issues as they apply to the work of police departments and other law enforcement organizations at the federal, state, and local level. The course will focus on the Bill of Rights, particularly the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments to the Constitution of the United States, as well as the Fourteenth Amendment. The course examines the application of these rights in the enforcement, investigation, and adjudication of crime.

CRJ 311 Forensics

3 Credits

Forensic science applies scientific methodology to crime scene investigation and crime solving. This course analyzes techniques of crime scene investigation and the lawful gathering of evidence. Emphasis is placed upon the Federal Rules of Evidence, including the admissibility of physical evidence at trial, as well as the role of forensic science in the criminal justice system and the identification, collection, and preservation of physical evidence (chain of custody issues).

CRJ 312 Crime & Society

3 Credits

The purpose and procedures pertaining to probation and parole are analyzed in this course. Topics include pre-sentence investigation, supervision of probationers, parole administration and services, treatment theory, juvenile services, and parole officers. Students are introduced to such new concepts as community-based corrections, the justice model, and determinate sentencing and their impact on traditional policy and practice.

CRJ 422 Criminal Justice Capstone

3 Credits

Students will review all learning objectives achieved throughout previous coursework and develop a comprehensive, focused study of a modern criminal justice issue while applying solutions and predictions for future trends in criminal and social justice. Successful students will focus on the pragmatic application of principles and theories that guide criminal justice practice in the United States. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the General Education Capstone course.

CRJ 501 Criminal Justice, Criminal Law & the Constitution

3 Credits

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the criminal justice system, substantive criminal law, and the U.S. Constitution. This course may be waived for students holding undergraduate degrees in criminal justice or having completed certain courses.

CRJ 510 Criminal Justice Policy & Theory

3 Credits

This course provides an extensive analysis of the functions, processes, and structures of the criminal justice system. Principles, doctrines, selected rules of criminal law, and law as social control will be examined.

CRJ 512 Criminological Theory

3 Credits

This course explores classical and contemporary literature in criminology and criminal justice. Both theory and empirical research will be used to examine criminal behavior as well as the structure, function, and interaction of the criminal justice system.

CRJ 514 Constitutional & Judicial Processes

3 Credits

This course examines the structure, functions, and operations of the constitution and judicial processes. The impact of historical and contemporary constitutional issues on the criminal justice process will also be examined.

CRJ 520 Research Methods in Criminal Justice

3 Credits

This course introduces the use of research methods in the study of criminal justice. The focus is on the examination of the issues related to collecting, analyzing, and using data. Students will learn to test hypotheses, draw inferences, and write a research report.

CRJ 522 Psychological Factors in Criminal Justice

3 Credits

This course introduces students to the use of psychological methods and theoretical models in the criminal justice system. Students will examine criminal and police psychology with an overview of forensic psychology.

CRJ 524 Ethics in Criminal Justice

3 Credits

This course examines theoretical and applied criminal justice ethical standards as they relate to criminal justice decision-making. Students will evaluate issues concerning discretion, due process, truthfulness, corruption, and discrimination.

CRJ 613 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

3 Credits

This course provides an international perspective on law enforcement. Students will focus on the phenomena of globalization of criminal activity, major aspects of the legal traditions and criminal justice systems of selected countries, as well as international legal and law enforcement institutions.

CRJ 615 Victimology

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the principles and concepts of victimology, an analysis of patterns and trends, as well as theoretical reasoning and responses to criminal victimization. Students will examine the consequences suffered by victims as well as the services and resources available to them.

CRJ 620 Organizational Behavior in Law Enforcement & Corrections

3 Credits

This course provides an analysis of the various issues facing criminal justice and correctional organizations in the context of professional practice, including, the theoretical concepts of organizational behavior, management and leadership of human resources, and design and structural processes of such organizations. Included topics are fiscal accountability; personnel deployment; implementation of change, motivation and retention of personnel, the hiring, assignment, and promotion of personnel, organizational communication; professional development, and applicable legal issues as they pertain to agency operations.

CRJ 621 Cybercrime Investigation

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the methods for investigating internet crime. Students will learn how to gather evidence, build a case against the perpetrator, and manage an Internet crime scene.

CRJ 622 Introduction to Forensic Science

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the history of forensic science along with current technologies, procedures and methods of laboratory analysis in use today. Topics covered will include recognition, protection, documentation and collection of physical evidence as well as analysis of such physical evidence. Legal recognition of new technologies will also be reviewed.

CRJ 623 Homeland Security

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the responsibilities and functions across agencies at various jurisdictional levels that have the charge of mitigating hostilities, threats, hazards, and consequences. Additionally, this course will study the methods of the most effective response systems. Students will develop the skills to identify, evaluate and resolve complex policy issues and initiate practical actions.

CRJ 625 Employment & Policy Law for Law Enforcement & Corrections Administrators

3 Credits

This course explores specialized topics in substantive and procedural law with a special emphasis on employment law, and how these legal issues impact ethics and leadership in criminal justice and correctional organizations. This course is well suited for command-level personnel in response to a variety of potential agency and personal liability issues.

CRJ 626 Computer Forensics

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the methods for preventing and detecting cybercrime. Students will learn the basics of retrieving and analyzing data from various mediums, such as computers, global positioning systems, or removable storage devices.

CRJ 627 Advanced Forensic Science

3 Credits

This course will review the forensic science subjects covered in CRJ 622 and introduce the student to the scientific techniques used in processing evidence found at investigations and crime scenes. This course is designed to allow the student to complete exercises in the forensic fields most commonly used today.

CRJ 628 Terrorism: Threats & Strategy

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of terrorism, both international and domestic. The course will explore the causes and effects of terrorism as they relate to political structures from both religious and historical perspectives; with particular focus on present day impacts.

CRJ 630 Budgeting for Finance Law Enforcement & Corrections Administrators

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to public program budgeting and finance concepts. Special emphasis is given to methods of financing public programs and the preparation and management of budgets for the programs. This course is intended to provide students with an opportunity to learn and practice the technical aspects of program budgeting and finance in the public safety arena.

CRJ 631 Security & Protection for Cybercrime

3 Credits

This course will instruct students of the basic rights of business and individuals who are affected by cybercrime as well as the means to protect them. Students will learn how to protect potential victims whether minors in chat rooms or multinational businesses from cyber criminals.

CRJ 632 Crime Scene Investigation & Management

3 Credits

This course will introduce the student to the forensic techniques utilized in crime scene investigations (CSI). Students will learn how to process and retrieve trace evidence such as DNA and other items of evidentiary value. Student will also learn accepted methodologies employed in contemporary crime scene management. Students will also become familiarized with commonly accepted forensic techniques, contemporary specialized techniques, and judicial expectations and requirements relative to the admittance of evidence collected by forensic crime scene investigators.

CRJ 633 Risk Assessment

3 Credits

This course is intended to provide the student with advanced knowledge and understanding of the area of risk assessment and management. The focus is on the recognition of real and perceived threats, sharing information between communities and agencies, the collaboration of resources, and the management of risk. Students will examine the concepts of risk assessment, risk analysis, and the impacts of actual and suspected threats.

CRJ 697 Capstone: Evaluation & Program Analysis in Criminal Justice

3 Credits

Students will research key concepts, methods, and issues in the field of evaluation research. In addition, students will analyze and develop an evaluation proposal on a discreet topic within the field of criminal justice. The focus will center on needs assessment, impact, monitoring, as well as the application of quantitative and qualitative techniques.

CST Computer Software Technology

CST 301 Software Technology & Design

3 Credits

In this course, students will learn the application of theory, knowledge, and practices to effectively and efficiently build reliable software systems that satisfy the requirements of customers and users. Students will understand all phases of the lifecycle of a software system, including requirements analysis and specification, software architecture, design patterns and concerns, software development methodologies (i.e. waterfall and agile process development), and software testing. Prerequisite: CPT 310.

CST 304 Software Requirements & Analysis

3 Credits

The course will discuss concepts for systematically establishing, defining and managing the requirements for a large, complex, changing and software-intensive systems, from technical, organizational and management perspectives. The course will involve building models of both requirements Technology process and requirements Technology product, concerning both functional and non-functional. Prerequisite: CST 301

CST 307 Software Architecture & Design

3 Credits

This course introduces basic concepts and principles about software architecture and design. It starts with discussion on architectural structures and styles, followed by coverage of design issues and design patterns. The emphasis is on the interaction between software design and quality attributes such as availability, performance, security, interoperability, and modifiability. Prerequisite: CST 301

CST 310 Software Development

3 Credits

This course introduces students to modern software development principles and practices. It provides the necessary grounding on the different technologies associated with developing business websites. Students in this course will learn client-side web development (such as HTML5, CSS3, and Bootstrap); as well as server-side web development using PHP programing language. Prerequisite: CST 301

CST 313 Software Testing

3 Credits

This course introduces students to software testing and quality control concepts, principles, and methodologies. The emphasis here is on understanding software testing process, planning, strategy, criteria, and testing methods, as well as software quality assurance concepts & control process. It covers the various subjects, including test models, test design techniques (black box and white-box testing techniques), integration, regression, and system testing methods. Prerequisite: CST 301

CST 316 Information Security Management

3 Credits

This course introduces students to skills, knowledge, techniques, and tools required by information technology security professionals. Topics include application security principles and techniques, network security mechanisms, cryptography, and secure programming techniques including cross site scripting, and SQL injection. Prerequisite: CST 301

CST 499 Capstone for Computer Software Technology

3 Credits

This course will offer an opportunity for students to work on real life problems through an applied project in a teamwork environment. This course will cover the major software development lifecycle phases: software requirements gathering, software architecture & design, software development, software testing, and software project management. Students are required to apply appropriate methodologies to the activities in the aforementioned phases based on the selected topic. Each group of students will report their progress through a weekly interactive assignment and receive feedback from the instructor. Upon the completion of the course, each group will be required to submit a professional technical report and a working software demonstration. Prerequisites: GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program. 

CYB Cyber & Data Security Technology

CYB 300 System Administration & Security

3 Credits

In this course, students will learn how to manage the technology that affects organizations. Concepts covered include security best practices, access control, network components and services, change management, and configuration management. Students will gain an understanding of how the services offered by the various network components should be managed and protected. Prerequisite: INT 301.

CYB 301 Introduction to Cyber & Data Security Technology

3 Credits

This course introduces students to the principles of information systems security (confidentiality, integrity, and availability) and the seven domains of the typical IT infrastructure. Risks, threats, and vulnerabilities will be defined. Creation of an IT security policy framework will be emphasized. The following topics will be introduced: the risk management process, cryptography, compliance laws, and information security standards. At the end of the course, students will be able to apply the security life cycle to an information system.

CYB 302 Secure Web Applications & Social Networking

3 Credits

This course introduces the risks associated with connecting to the Internet via web applications and social networking. Students will learn the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) Top 10 threats to web applications and the threat classifications of the Web Application Security Consortium (WASC). Instruction on how to maintain PCI-DSS compliance in e-commerce sites will be provided. At the end of the course, students will be able to secure web applications and mitigate vulnerabilities with web applications on the Linux and Windows platforms.

CYB 400 Cryptography

3 Credits

This course expands upon the cryptography concepts learned in CYB 301 Introduction to Cyber & Data Security Technology. A history of cryptography will be presented. Topics include symmetric encryption algorithms, asymmetric encryption algorithms, and hashing functions. The protocols, tools, and techniques used in cryptography will be reviewed. Hacking techniques that use cryptography will be introduced. At the end of the course, students will be able to design a cryptography plan to safeguard information that is electronically transmitted.

CYB 401 Risk Management & Infrastructure

3 Credits

This course builds upon the risk management concepts learned in CYB 301 Introduction to Cyber & Data Security Technology. Topics presented are risk management standards, methods, and tools and IT governance and control frameworks. Methods to prepare a risk analysis will be reviewed. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to identify an organization’s threats and vulnerabilities, and the associated risks along with the probability that the risks will occur.

CYB 402 Computer Forensics

3 Credits

This course builds upon the compliance concepts learned in CYB 301 Introduction to Cyber & Data Security Technology. Students will examine laws and/or regulations that may apply to an organization. The various types of evidence and how to protect the evidence via the chain of custody will be emphasized. Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to perform a digital forensic investigation.

CYB 499 Capstone for Cyber & Data Security Technology

3 Credits

In the Cyber & Data Security Technology Capstone course, students will complete an original and significant project that integrates concepts, principles, and tools taught throughout the program. In this course, the student will design, implement, test, and document a secured solution of the seven domains of an organization’s IT infrastructure. A presentation will be made by the individual for evaluation and approval. Prerequisites: GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program.

DOC Doctoral

DOC 8770 Doctoral Capstone Seminar

4 Credits

This seminar provides students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in their curriculum to highly realistic case studies related to their fields of specialization for the doctorate. Through discussions among students and the instructor, students will review, analyze and evaluate case studies emphasizing the practice of the content in their curriculum. The course will involve the analysis and evaluation of one or more case studies. Students will contemplate complex questions posed by their instructor, reply to those questions, respond to other students’ analyses and evaluations, and receive faculty feedback. Each student will submit a final assignment on each case, involving his or her critical thinking on the core issues presented in the case and the presentation and defense of an approach to addressing those core issues. (This course may not be transferred in.)

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